charnwoodstoves

The importance of wall protection when installing a freestanding stove

As the cold season is fast approaching, many homeowners are rushing to prepare for the winter, and one effective way is to get your fireplace ready. As you will be aware, the fireplace serves to keep you and your family warm and comfortable during the winter months. Whether it’s a wood-burning or multi-fuel burner, it produces controlled heat that can warm your home’s space.

However, did you know that a vital part of the overall equation in your wood-burning stove is the heat shield? As the name suggests, it is typically installed behind a freestanding stove and it is designed to protect your wall from heat damage. However, while most wood stoves come with heat shields, some don’t have one.

In this article, we’ll specifically cover how to set clearances and install heat shields for wood stoves:

Have adequate clearances

When it comes to a wood stove, there are two key safety features you must keep in mind – sufficient clearance and wall material behind. A properly installed and maintained wood stove can ensure the safety of your appliance. Yet, inadequate clearances can be extremely dangerous for your home.

The Fire Protection Association recommends that the common radiant-type stove must be spaced out at least 900mm (36 inches) from a combustible wall although different wood burning stove manufacturers will offer their own tested safe distances. This is extremely important as your wood stove can get very hot when in operation. As a result, combustible materials too close to the stove can catch fire. By cheating on your wood stove’s clearances, you can potentially create a fire hazard.

Reduce wood stove clearances

On the other hand, know that you can reduce the clearance of your wood stove without compromising your home safety. Although you cannot completely eliminate the clearance, you can significantly reduce it. There’s only one solution to this, and that is to install a properly constructed heat shield.

For your reference, there are various types of heat shields you may want to consider for your wood stove. Be sure to follow the guidelines set forth by the HETAS for the heat shielding requirements, from the appliance selection down to its actual installation.

Vitreous Enamel heat shields

When it comes to wood stoves, installing a wall mounted heat shield is an excellent way to reduce clearance and promote home safety. A vitreous enamel heat shield is a great solution.

Vlaze Heat Shields are designed to protect and enhance the wall behind a wood burning stove creating a modern fireplace.

The vitreous enamel panel features a dual skin that provides thermal protection and an effective convection system that distributes heat back into the room. Using their rail mounted system the heat shield is quick and easy to install and is available in 3 sizes and over 30 luxurious glazed finishes. When installed on a wall the shield reduces the stoves distance to the face of the panel to 95mm and in the case of a Charnwood stove to just 75mm – a vast improvement on HETAS regulations.

Conclusion

At this point, you now know several valuable tips for your wood stove. As mentioned above, be sure to have adequate clearance or reduce wood stove clearances by installing heat shields. Furthermore, it’s best to deal with a reliable manufacturer when purchasing and installing a heat shield for your wood-burning stove. Doing so will help you make the most of your stove, protect your home, and keep you warm during the cold season!

 

 

charnwoodstoves

Home is where the hearth is: Tradition and forward-thinking technology are the fundamental tenets for this family-run Isle of Wight firm with more than half a century of history.

Back in 1972 when Charnwood Stoves founder Alfred Wells and two of his sons John and Alistair sat by an open fire in the village of Niton on the Isle of Wight, little did the trio know that their small engineering firm would become a 21st-century market leading company.

That night saw the three men come up with the notion to create a compact, efficient woodburning stove that was to become the cornerstone of the company. Fuelled by rapidly rising oil prices and the advent of Dutch Elm disease, meaning there was a plentiful supply of wood across the UK, their idea soon became a reality that today encompasses both traditional values and forward-thinking technology in the form of clean, green and efficient woodburning and multi-fuel stoves.

The privately owned family company employs around 140 people – ten of whom are family members – and continues to operate in the same location, to the same exacting standards set out by the three men some 50 years ago, with all stoves and accessories made on site with British parts. “Though we’re constantly innovating, our products are designed to last a lifetime,” says Ced Wells, grandson of Alfred and creative director of the company. “We still hold spare parts for our original stoves – we firmly believe that when you purchase a stove it is a long-term relationship.”

Tradition and prescient thinking are held in equal stead by the Wells family. Whilst the gentle crackle of burning logs and the soothing allure of flickering flames has long held a romantic appeal, as evidenced in Charnwood’s stylish designs spanning contemporary through to traditional, happily the reality of using wood as fuel equally sustains its draw. In order to best utilise the material’s properties as a renewable, sustainable and CO2-neutral fuel, technological solutions employed by the company include stoves with emissions so low that they are DEFRA-approved for burning wood in smoke-control areas, whilst the latest clean-burn technology in the Aire models amongst others ensures that the strict new Ecodesign regulation planned for 2022 is met as priority (the regulation being the stove industry’s response to the DEFRA Clean Air Strategy, which itself aims to improve air quality and reduce emissions and pollution).

Alongside its products, the relationships fostered by Charnwood are rooted in the family’s close-knit ethos and Christian beliefs, and extend into the community and beyond as a reflection of their deeply held values. “The concept of ‘relationship’ is probably the most important thing in our lives and business,” explains Ced. “We believe it’s important to take care of others, which in business terms manifests itself in supporting people – so our employees, our suppliers and our customers – and in connecting with the environment.”

In addition to using local suppliers and materials where possible, Charnwood’s commitment to the island pays homage to the intrinsic it plays in the company’s origin story. “The people that work for us have shaped what we have become,” says Ced. “They are our most valuable asset and are an extension of our family – many of them have been with us for more than 30 years.” As well as being well-connected to schools, colleges and businesses, the company offers apprenticeship schemes for young people in engineering, design and manufacture, “as job opportunities can be scarce on the island – and we very much want to see it thrive and grow as an economy.”

Plans for the future include a continued focus on uniting tradition with innovation: “We’re soon to be launching the world’s first intelligent woodburning stove that automatically burns your fuel to optimum efficiency,” outlines Ced. “The idea is that you load it, light it, close the door and then the stove does the rest” – a concept which doubtless is as faithful, loyal and consistently aligned with the core values of the company 50 years ago as it is today.

Words: Eve Middleton for The English Home November 2020

 

charnwoodstoves

Charnwood stoves specified for Danh Vo's Chicxulub show

We were recently asked to supply six Ecodesign Ready wood burning stoves for a show at The White Cube Gallery in Bermondsey, London. The work ‘Live Free or Die’ is part of artist Danh Vo’s exhibition, Chicxulub. Stacks of firewood are used to fuel six Charnwood Skye 7 stoves installed throughout the gallery, in return giving off heat and an atmospheric light which illuminates the space.

The stoves are placed on gloss black vitreous enamel Vlaze hearth plates

The show runs from 11 September – 2 November 2020 Click here for further details 

Stoves were installed by London stove specialists Stoake  

 

charnwoodstoves

Interior design can have a dramatic impact on the overall look and feel of a room, but this doesn’t always require a complete overhaul of a space – or even super matchy-matchy decor, for that matter. No, often it takes just one or two key features to transform a room from bland to beautiful.

Want to know more? Well, luckily for you, today we’ll be sharing a number of focal feature ideas for different areas of the home that are guaranteed to completely change a room’s ambience. From eye-catching staircases to cosy boiler stoves and more, we’ll show you how just one focal feature can steal the show.

1. Use stairs to create heavenly hallways

There’s no escaping the fact that most hallways simply serve the purpose of ushering people through to the more exciting rooms. However, as the gateway to your home, let your hallway be the star of the show for a change, using your stairs as an eye-catching feature.

If you have the space and budget, one idea is to install a fairytale spiral staircase. Curving around as you ascend to the next level brings something magical to a typically mundane act, as well as creating a stunning focal point for your home.

For more traditional staircases, why not use colour to accentuate their natural beauty? This could be brightly coloured carpet runners or a bold wallpaper print used on the back of stair treads. You could even go for painted stair treads or spindles in an ombre effect for a more playful look. The key here is to pair bold tones and patterns with pale, neutral hues like white, light grey or cream to allow the colours to speak for themselves.

2. Create a focal feature with fire

Fireplaces are a tried and tested focal feature in many homes, and for good reason. Back in the olden days, they were the place to gather to keep warm and cook, but in modern homes they offer the perfect opportunity to make a stylish design element – regardless of whether the fireplace is functional or not.

If you’re blessed with a traditional-style open fireplace with a mantlepiece or chimney breast, bring it bang up to date with a colourful makeover. This could be embellishing the hearth with patterned tiles or giving the fireplace itself a fresh coat of paint. If the fire isn’t usable, don’t leave it empty. Use candles, flowers or other decorative ornaments to draw the eye in and transform it from a functional element of the room to an integral design piece.

Of course, open-fireplaces aren’t your only option. If you’re looking to give your living room a cosy feel, then a free-standing stove could be the way to go. With models available in a choice of colours and styles, you can give the heart of your home that centrepiece it deserves. Finish your design with a collection of stove accessories like a funky wood basket and a sumptuous rug laid in front of the fire for soaking up that warm glow of an evening.

3. Give your kitchen the wow factor

Whatever set up you have in your kitchen, this busy room is primed for making a style statement in your home – and it doesn’t require a full-scale kitchen makeover either. Instead, pick one key feature to update and let this be the core focus of your kitchen interior.

As the workhorse of most kitchens, we love the idea of making your kitchen worktops do more than just food prep and display various kitchen appliances. With a simple countertop update, you can transform the entire look and feel of your kitchen without even having to consider replacing any other integral pieces like cabinets and appliances.

For a timeless look that can be adapted to both classic and contemporary kitchen design, sleek and elegant granite worktops are a sensible choice. Not least, they’re incredibly durable and practical, meaning they’ll stay looking pristine and beautiful for decades with minimal effort, but also the wide choice of colours gives them incredible versatility to suit almost any decor style.

4. Let original features shine through

Whether you’re updating your bedroom, living room or kitchen, sometimes you don’t need to invest in adding new decorative details to a space to give it a fresh new look. Stripping back rooms to accentuate their original features can work equally as well in altering its aesthetic.

If your property has some quirky original features like exposed brickwork, wooden ceiling beams or vintage parquet floors, let these features come to the fore. You may think this will only work if you love rustic or industrial interiors, but you’d be wrong.

Contrasting old and new interiors correctly can make these design elements even more distinctive. Think a high-end modern all-white kitchen set against a striking red brick backdrop with pops of zesty coloured accents added in to soften the look. Or an ultra minimalist bedroom design that’s centred around original wooden floors, using a cool colour palette and simplistic decor to highlight its natural beauty.

Whichever avenue you choose to go down with giving your home defining focal features, we hope this gives you plenty of ideas on how to use one or two core elements in your interior design to transform the space.

Author bio:

Sophie Armstrong is a content creator for granite and quartz worktop specialists Burlington Granite who provide a full bespoke worktop solution by offering templating, cutting, polishing and fitting, all driven by 25 years of industry experience

charnwoodstoves

Similar to a wood burning stove in design and appearance, a multi-fuel stove enables you to  burn coal and mineral fuels in addition to wood, making it a versatile and functional heating solution for your home.

The main difference in the design of a multi-fuel stove is that it features a grate with a removable ash-pan enabling you to burn different fuels at their best efficiency.

How does a multi-fuel stove work?

Just like a wood burning stove a multi-fuel stove has a number of different components, including the firebox where the fuel is loaded and lit, a door that provides easy access for loading the fuel and lighting the fire, a glass window so that you can watch your fire burning, a flue to draw the emissions into the chimney and an air vent that provides an air supply, while controlling how quickly the fuel burns. Coal and mineral fuels burn most efficiently with under grate air whereas wood burns best on a bed of ash.

The Charnwood converting grate switches from a flat bed to an open grate with flick of a lever on the side. This can also be used as an effective riddling mechanism depositing ash and embers into the removable ashpan below. The riddling can be untaken with the doors closed ensuring mess is kept to a minimum. This grate is built into our Island, Cove, Skye, Arc, SLX and Country boiler ranges.

Charnwood also offer a reciprocating grate: a retro-fit grate that converts our C-Series and Country models (non-Blu) into multi-fuel appliances

Contemporary multi-fuel stoves are extremely energy efficient. With this in mind, it’s no surprise that this functional and aesthetically pleasing heating solution has increased in popularity in recent years.

How to light a multi-fuel stove

It’s easy to light a multi-fuel stove and, as long as you adopt the right technique, it is also extremely safe. We recommend the top down method – simply follow these steps:

Set the grate to the correct burning position. Open grate for mineral fuels or a flat bed for wood.

Place your chosen fuel on the stove bed.

On top of this build a stack of 6-8 kindling sticks

Then place a natural fire lighter inside

Fully open the air control for maximum air intake and a quick and easy ignition

Light the fire lighter and close the door but leave it slightly a jar

This helps to heat the chimney flue and burn hot and clean

Once the fire is burning well close the door and reduce the air intake

Re-fuel little and often

Every time a log or fuel is added open the air control again until the fire is burning well and then return the control to normal

By running your stove in this way you will achieve maximum efficiency with minimum emissions

How long does a multi-fuel stove last?

If you maintain and burn your multi-fuel stove correctly you could enjoy it for many decades. Of course, you can expect to have to replace certain consumable parts during this time such as door seals, glass and fire bricks but at Charnwood we hold good stock of all components past and present that can be ordered from our online shop.

If you’re considering buying a multi-fuel stove, please get in touch.

charnwoodstoves

Used in households across the world, wood burning stoves are powerful heating solutions that can provide warmth and charm to virtually any home.

Far more efficient and environmentally friendly than other sources of heat, a wood burning stove is a sound investment and is a great option if you’re looking to replace an older, open style fire. Charnwood’s wide range of Ecodesign Ready stoves are up to 90% more efficient than a traditional open fires and older stoves.

How does a wood burning stove work?

Wood burning stoves offer exceptional reliability and can be used to heat properties of all shapes and sizes, as well as individual rooms. They remain one of the most energy efficient ways to heat a property, using renewable and locally sourced fuels to generate heat.

How to use a wood burning stove

A wood burning stove generates a great deal of heat, so we would recommend you wear protective gloves when operating it.

One of the keys to a successful fire is to ensure your wood is dry with a moisture level of less than 20%.

Start by making a small ‘Jenga’ stack of kindling around a firelighter on top of 2 small logs. A top tip is to use a natural fire lighter as this generates better results with a cleaner burn.

Once you’ve done this, you can then light your fire. To get the fire started you should always leave the stove door slightly cracked open and the air lever pulled all the way out to allow oxygen to flow over the kindling. If you do need to re-fuel the fire at any point, simply open the air supply lever and the door to the stove, then place your new logs on your stack of burning wood. We recommend loading little and often.

How to install a wood burning stove

It is important your stove is fitted by a HETAS registered engineer or fitted according to Building Regulations (document J) and signed off by Building Control.

We would always recommend purchasing a stove through one of our official Charnwood stockists who will either offer a full installation service or recommend a registered installer. We have carefully handpicked our dealerships to ensure they provide you with the best advice, service and, crucially, after sales support. Stoves purchased through this route also qualify for our 10 year dealer backed guarantee and a 1 year no quibble guarantee on all consumable parts (such as door seals, firebricks and glass).

There are many things to consider when it comes to wood burning stove installation, including whether you have an existing chimney breast or fireplace, distances to combustible materials, the size of your room, the age of your property and how well insulated your home is.

Your official Charnwood stockist will, in most cases, carry out a full survey of your fireplace and  will need to know a number of things about your property including if you’re installing the stove in a smoke-controlled area. They will also recommend the right sized stove for your property and ensure that the model you choose complies with current and future regulations.

If you’re considering buying a wood burning stove, get in touch with our skilled and experienced team.

charnwoodstoves

When it comes to choosing fuel for your wood burning stove, it’s important that you burn the right wood. This will not only ensure that your stove burns stronger and for longer, but it will also help reduce your fuel costs as a result.

Burning the wrong type of wood can increase fuel costs and damage the internal parts of your stove. In some cases, it can even cause irreparable damage to the stove body or flue system, so it’s important you understand what type of wood will work with your appliance.

Here’s a closer look at what you should burn in your wood burning stove.

Hardwood firewood

Hardwood is a great fuel for wood burning stoves. With a variety of different types available, including ash, birch, maple and oak, as well as the wood from the vast majority of fruit trees, hardwood firewood is renowned for burning for longer periods, while generating lots of heat.

Another advantage of hardwoods is that they are generally cleaner to handle, making them a great option for your stove.

Softwood firewood

A lot cheaper than hardwood, softwood can also be used in your wood burning stove. Fir is the most popular choice, although there are plenty of other options, including balsam, pine, spruce, cedar, alder, tamarack and poplar.

How do softwoods burn compared to hardwood?

Softwoods tend to burn faster than hardwood and leave a finer ash behind. They can also be messy to handle and are renowned for causing a build-up of tar in your chimney. Spruce, pine and balsam can be particularly difficult to handle.

What’s the best firewood for generating heat energy?

There are lots of different types of firewood and many of them can be categorised based on their performance. For example, the following types of firewood typically generate the best amount of heat energy:

• Apple
• Birch (Yellow)
• Red oak
• White ash
• Maple (Sugar)
• White oak
• Beech (American)
• Hickory (Shagbark)
• Ironwood

Whether you opt for hardwood or softwood, always make sure that it is totally dry before you use it. Never attempt to burn green wood as it will produce less heat and a lot more smoke.

Make sure your wood is dried, seasoned and stored correctly so you can enjoy optimum heat with low fuel costs. Your wood should always be stacked in a cool dry place with efficient air circulation and covered on the top only. If you can, rotate your wood as much as possible and always burn older, dryer wood first.

As a general rule of thumb, hardwood and softwood should have a moisture content of less than 20 percent if it’s being used for burning.

If you have any questions about your Charnwood wood burning stove, please get in touch.

charnwoodstoves

More people than ever before are using a wood burning stove to heat their homes.

With the ability to quickly and effectively heat up a single room or even an entire home, wood burning stoves are one of the most efficient ways to heat a space. Of course, wood burning stoves also look great and can add an exciting focal point to any room.

If you’re thinking about investing in a wood burning stove, you’re in the right place. Here’s our guide to everything you need to know about using one.

Correct installation

We always recommend that you buy your stove through an official Charnwood stockist, where the installation and after-sales support will be of a standard approved by us.
It is important your stove is installed by either by a HETAS registered engineer or in accordance to building regulations (refer to document J https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/combustion-appliances-and-fuel-storage-systems-approved-document-j )

All official Charnwood Stockists will offer this service and by purchasing through this channel you will also qualify for our 10 year dealer backed guarantee.

Familiarise yourself with our stove instruction guide

First and foremost, when you are having your wood burning stove installed, it’s important to familiarise yourself with our instruction guide, so that you know how to get the best from your stove.

Choosing the right fuel

Next, you’ll need to choose the right fuel for your stove, either a hardwood or a softwood fuel. Failure to use the correct fuel can affect how long your fire burns, increase fuel costs, and damage the internal parts of your woodburning stove. It can even cause damage to the stove body or flue system.

To light your stove we recommend the top down method.

1) Clear the grate of ash then Place 2-3 smaller logs on the stove bed
2) On top of this build a stack of 6-8 kindling sticks
3) Then place a natural fire lighter inside
4) Fully open the air control for maximum air intake and a quick and easy ignition
5) Light the fire lighter and close the door but leave it slightly a jar
6) This helps to heat the chimney flue and burn hot and clean
7) Once the fire is burning well close the door and reduce the air intake
8) Re-fuel little and often
9) Every time a log is added open the air control again until the fire is burning well and then return the control to normal

By running your stove in this way you will achieve maximum efficiency with minimum emissions

To find out more about using your Charnwood wood burning stove, please get in touch.

charnwoodstoves

Suitable for heating a wide variety of different living spaces, wood burning stoves are incredibly popular.

One of the most efficient ways to heat a property, a wood burning stove is capable of heating just a room or an entire home, while helping to keep your energy bills low. Functional and aesthetically pleasing, a wood burning stove also provides an attractive focal point in any living area.

But how do you clean your wood burning stove? During the winter months, when the majority of homeowners use their stove regularly, it’s easy for wood burning stoves to become dirty and in need of some TLC.

If you’re looking to clean your stove, we’ve put together our top tips on how to clean a wood burning stove to keep it looking as good as new.

Wood burning stove cleaning tips and tricks

Cleaning the surface

When it comes to cleaning your stove’s exterior surface and surrounding area, you can’t go far wrong with a soft brush, damp cloth and a vacuum cleaner. These tools are ideal for removing any soot and dirt and is best undertaken when your stove is unlit and cool.

How to clean glass on a wood burning stove

It is always important to burn well seasoned, dry logs on your stove but occasionally soot will accumulate on the glass of your wood stove, especially if you’ve been using firewood with a moisture content over 20%. The good news is, it can be easily removed by dipping a damp cloth into the soft ashes from the stove and simply wiping away the soot from the glass. You will also find there are a number of different wood burning stove cleaners on the market that you can use to clean the glass effectively. At Charnwood we offer our Schott dry wiper which works very well.

Empty your ash pan

When your wood burning stove is not in use it is worth emptying out the ash pan as well as the firebox completely . However, when it’s time to use your stove again during cooler evenings and colder months, it is useful to remember that lighting your fire on a bed of ash is much more effective.

Inspect the door and flue seals

When cleaning your wood burning stove, take the opportunity to inspect the rope seals on the doors and flue. It’s not uncommon for the seals to succumb to everyday wear and tear, so it’s important that these are checked frequently and changed if necessary.

A fresh spray of paint

Finally, if your stove is looking tired and unloved, don’t be afraid to get out the stove paint can.

The vast majority of Charnwood stoves are painted with heat resistant paint, however they can become scratched and pick up dust and dirt over time. Before painting your stove, you should make sure that the surface is dry, clean and free from any grease. Before spraying your stove we would recommend masking off the glass and handles and gently rubbing down any areas to be retouched with a Scotchbrite pad. You can purchase Charnwood high temperature stove paint from your local Charnwood stockist or on our spares shop. We offer a choice of eight colours and even full paint kits if you choose to ever change the colour of your stove completely.

 

Follow these tips and your wood burning stove should be good as new in no time at all.

 

To find out more about cleaning your wood burning stove, get in touch.

charnwoodstoves

When it comes to choosing wood for burning, many people are searching for something that is best in terms of sustainability. Wood is a viable energy source that is virtually carbon neutral and also a cost-effective heat source for many homes. To help you find the best firewood for your needs, we’ve put together this handy chart to show you the different types of firewood available and the benefits they each offer.

Which firewood should I choose?

When choosing your firewood, we would recommend opting for a hardwood as they are generally denser than softwoods and will produce more heat and burn longer. However, softwoods do light quicker and can be cheaper, but they are more resinous than hardwoods, meaning they are more likely to build up tar deposits in your flue.

Common hardwood species include beech and oak.

Common softwood species include cedar and pine.

Kiln dried logs are a good option as these guarantee a low moisture content. ‘Ready to burn’ logs should have less than 20 per cent moisture levels for optimum heat output and efficiency, and with kiln dried logs you can be sure you’re purchasing a consistently dried log that will provide the best source of heat. Naturally seasoned logs are generally less expensive but be sure to test the moisture content before burning. They will need to have been seasoned for at least one year, preferably two.

Which wood burns the longest?

There are several firewoods that burn for a sufficient amount of time, but oak and hawthorn are both favourable hardwoods to choose. These both burn slowly and produce a good source of heat.

Although hardwoods are a more efficient fuel source in terms of heat output and burning time, they can be harder to ignite from cold. This is when softwood kindling comes in handy, as it can help you get your fire up and running, before using the hardwood to fuel and maintain the slow burning fire.

The following chart is a common list of UK firewoods, showing you if they are hardwood or softwood and providing some detail of their characteristics.

 

Firewood Name Hard or softwood Comments Grade
Alder Hardwood Generally considered a low quality firewood as it burns quickly and provides little heat. Poor

 

Firewood Name Hard or softwood Comments Grade
Apple Hardwood Needs to be seasoned. Has a nice smell and burns well with a without sparking/spitting. Good
Ash Hardwood Considered one of the best firewoods. It has a low water content and can be burned green. It is still best when seasoned and will burn at a steady rate. Great
Beech Hardwood Beech has a high water content so will only burn well when seasoned. Good
Birch Hardwood Birch burns easily but also fast, so is best mixed with slower burning wood such as Elm or Oak. A great fire lighter is birch bark. Good -Great
Cedar Softwood Cedar provides a pleasant smell and provides lasting heat but with little flame. You can also burn small pieces unseasoned. Okay
Cherry Hardwood Needs to be seasoned to burn well. Okay-Good
Elm Hardwood A good firewood but due to its high water content, it must be seasoned well. It may need assistance from another faster burning wood such as Birch to keep it burning effectively. Okay-Good
Hawthorn Hardwood A good firewood that burns well. Good-Great
Hazel Hardwood Excellent firewood when seasoned. Burns fast but with no spitting. Great
Holly Hardwood A good firewood that can be burnt green. Good
Hornbeam Hardwood A good firewood that burns well. Good
Horse Chestnut Hardwood Horse chestnut spits a lot and is considered a low quality firewood. Okay
Larch Softwood Needs to be seasoned well. Spits excessively while it burns and can produce a lot of soot. Poor
Lime Hardwood Considered a low quality firewood. Okay
Oak Hardwood One of the best firewoods when seasoned well.  It provides lasting heat and burns at a slow rate. Great
Pear Hardwood Needs to be well seasoned. Burns well with a pleasant smell and without spitting. Good
Pine Softwood Pine burns well but spits a lot and can leave behind soot. It can act as a good softwood kindling. Poor
Plane Hardwood A usable firewood. Good

 

Firewood Name Hard or softwood Comments Grade
Poplar Softwood Considered a poor firewood and produces black smoke. Poor
Rowan Hardwood Considered a good firewood that burns well. Good
Spruce Softwood Considered a low quality firewood. Okay
Sweet Chestnut Hardwood Burns when seasoned but spits excessively. Not for use on an open fire. Poor-Okay
Sycamore (Maples) Hardwood Considered a good firewood that burns well. Good
Walnut Hardwood Considered a low quality firewood. Okay
Willow Hardwood Willow has a high water content so only burns well when seasoned properly. Okay
Yew Hardwood Considered a usable firewood. Okay-Good