charnwoodstoves

Similar to a wood burning stove in design and appearance, a multi-fuel stove enables you to  burn coal and mineral fuels in addition to wood, making it a versatile and functional heating solution for your home.

The main difference in the design of a multi-fuel stove is that it features a grate with a removable ash-pan enabling you to burn different fuels at their best efficiency.

How does a multi-fuel stove work?

Just like a wood burning stove a multi-fuel stove has a number of different components, including the firebox where the fuel is loaded and lit, a door that provides easy access for loading the fuel and lighting the fire, a glass window so that you can watch your fire burning, a flue to draw the emissions into the chimney and an air vent that provides an air supply, while controlling how quickly the fuel burns. Coal and mineral fuels burn most efficiently with under grate air whereas wood burns best on a bed of ash.

The Charnwood converting grate switches from a flat bed to an open grate with flick of a lever on the side. This can also be used as an effective riddling mechanism depositing ash and embers into the removable ashpan below. The riddling can be untaken with the doors closed ensuring mess is kept to a minimum. This grate is built into our Island, Cove, Skye, Arc, SLX and Country boiler ranges.

Charnwood also offer a reciprocating grate: a retro-fit grate that converts our C-Series and Country models (non-Blu) into multi-fuel appliances

Contemporary multi-fuel stoves are extremely energy efficient. With this in mind, it’s no surprise that this functional and aesthetically pleasing heating solution has increased in popularity in recent years.

How to light a multi-fuel stove

It’s easy to light a multi-fuel stove and, as long as you adopt the right technique, it is also extremely safe. We recommend the top down method – simply follow these steps:

Set the grate to the correct burning position. Open grate for mineral fuels or a flat bed for wood.

Place your chosen fuel on the stove bed.

On top of this build a stack of 6-8 kindling sticks

Then place a natural fire lighter inside

Fully open the air control for maximum air intake and a quick and easy ignition

Light the fire lighter and close the door but leave it slightly a jar

This helps to heat the chimney flue and burn hot and clean

Once the fire is burning well close the door and reduce the air intake

Re-fuel little and often

Every time a log or fuel is added open the air control again until the fire is burning well and then return the control to normal

By running your stove in this way you will achieve maximum efficiency with minimum emissions

How long does a multi-fuel stove last?

If you maintain and burn your multi-fuel stove correctly you could enjoy it for many decades. Of course, you can expect to have to replace certain consumable parts during this time such as door seals, glass and fire bricks but at Charnwood we hold good stock of all components past and present that can be ordered from our online shop.

If you’re considering buying a multi-fuel stove, please get in touch.

charnwoodstoves

Used in households across the world, wood burning stoves are powerful heating solutions that can provide warmth and charm to virtually any home.

Far more efficient and environmentally friendly than other sources of heat, a wood burning stove is a sound investment and is a great option if you’re looking to replace an older, open style fire. Charnwood’s wide range of Ecodesign Ready stoves are up to 90% more efficient than a traditional open fires and older stoves.

How does a wood burning stove work?

Wood burning stoves offer exceptional reliability and can be used to heat properties of all shapes and sizes, as well as individual rooms. They remain one of the most energy efficient ways to heat a property, using renewable and locally sourced fuels to generate heat.

How to use a wood burning stove

A wood burning stove generates a great deal of heat, so we would recommend you wear protective gloves when operating it.

One of the keys to a successful fire is to ensure your wood is dry with a moisture level of less than 20%.

Start by making a small ‘Jenga’ stack of kindling around a firelighter on top of 2 small logs. A top tip is to use a natural fire lighter as this generates better results with a cleaner burn.

Once you’ve done this, you can then light your fire. To get the fire started you should always leave the stove door slightly cracked open and the air lever pulled all the way out to allow oxygen to flow over the kindling. If you do need to re-fuel the fire at any point, simply open the air supply lever and the door to the stove, then place your new logs on your stack of burning wood. We recommend loading little and often.

How to install a wood burning stove

It is important your stove is fitted by a HETAS registered engineer or fitted according to Building Regulations (document J) and signed off by Building Control.

We would always recommend purchasing a stove through one of our official Charnwood stockists who will either offer a full installation service or recommend a registered installer. We have carefully handpicked our dealerships to ensure they provide you with the best advice, service and, crucially, after sales support. Stoves purchased through this route also qualify for our 10 year dealer backed guarantee and a 1 year no quibble guarantee on all consumable parts (such as door seals, firebricks and glass).

There are many things to consider when it comes to wood burning stove installation, including whether you have an existing chimney breast or fireplace, distances to combustible materials, the size of your room, the age of your property and how well insulated your home is.

Your official Charnwood stockist will, in most cases, carry out a full survey of your fireplace and  will need to know a number of things about your property including if you’re installing the stove in a smoke-controlled area. They will also recommend the right sized stove for your property and ensure that the model you choose complies with current and future regulations.

If you’re considering buying a wood burning stove, get in touch with our skilled and experienced team.

charnwoodstoves

When it comes to choosing fuel for your wood burning stove, it’s important that you burn the right wood. This will not only ensure that your stove burns stronger and for longer, but it will also help reduce your fuel costs as a result.

Burning the wrong type of wood can increase fuel costs and damage the internal parts of your stove. In some cases, it can even cause irreparable damage to the stove body or flue system, so it’s important you understand what type of wood will work with your appliance.

Here’s a closer look at what you should burn in your wood burning stove.

Hardwood firewood

Hardwood is a great fuel for wood burning stoves. With a variety of different types available, including ash, birch, maple and oak, as well as the wood from the vast majority of fruit trees, hardwood firewood is renowned for burning for longer periods, while generating lots of heat.

Another advantage of hardwoods is that they are generally cleaner to handle, making them a great option for your stove.

Softwood firewood

A lot cheaper than hardwood, softwood can also be used in your wood burning stove. Fir is the most popular choice, although there are plenty of other options, including balsam, pine, spruce, cedar, alder, tamarack and poplar.

How do softwoods burn compared to hardwood?

Softwoods tend to burn faster than hardwood and leave a finer ash behind. They can also be messy to handle and are renowned for causing a build-up of tar in your chimney. Spruce, pine and balsam can be particularly difficult to handle.

What’s the best firewood for generating heat energy?

There are lots of different types of firewood and many of them can be categorised based on their performance. For example, the following types of firewood typically generate the best amount of heat energy:

• Apple
• Birch (Yellow)
• Red oak
• White ash
• Maple (Sugar)
• White oak
• Beech (American)
• Hickory (Shagbark)
• Ironwood

Whether you opt for hardwood or softwood, always make sure that it is totally dry before you use it. Never attempt to burn green wood as it will produce less heat and a lot more smoke.

Make sure your wood is dried, seasoned and stored correctly so you can enjoy optimum heat with low fuel costs. Your wood should always be stacked in a cool dry place with efficient air circulation and covered on the top only. If you can, rotate your wood as much as possible and always burn older, dryer wood first.

As a general rule of thumb, hardwood and softwood should have a moisture content of less than 20 percent if it’s being used for burning.

If you have any questions about your Charnwood wood burning stove, please get in touch.

charnwoodstoves

More people than ever before are using a wood burning stove to heat their homes.

With the ability to quickly and effectively heat up a single room or even an entire home, wood burning stoves are one of the most efficient ways to heat a space. Of course, wood burning stoves also look great and can add an exciting focal point to any room.

If you’re thinking about investing in a wood burning stove, you’re in the right place. Here’s our guide to everything you need to know about using one.

Correct installation

We always recommend that you buy your stove through an official Charnwood stockist, where the installation and after-sales support will be of a standard approved by us.
It is important your stove is installed by either by a HETAS registered engineer or in accordance to building regulations (refer to document J https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/combustion-appliances-and-fuel-storage-systems-approved-document-j )

All official Charnwood Stockists will offer this service and by purchasing through this channel you will also qualify for our 10 year dealer backed guarantee.

Familiarise yourself with our stove instruction guide

First and foremost, when you are having your wood burning stove installed, it’s important to familiarise yourself with our instruction guide, so that you know how to get the best from your stove.

Choosing the right fuel

Next, you’ll need to choose the right fuel for your stove, either a hardwood or a softwood fuel. Failure to use the correct fuel can affect how long your fire burns, increase fuel costs, and damage the internal parts of your woodburning stove. It can even cause damage to the stove body or flue system.

To light your stove we recommend the top down method.

1) Clear the grate of ash then Place 2-3 smaller logs on the stove bed
2) On top of this build a stack of 6-8 kindling sticks
3) Then place a natural fire lighter inside
4) Fully open the air control for maximum air intake and a quick and easy ignition
5) Light the fire lighter and close the door but leave it slightly a jar
6) This helps to heat the chimney flue and burn hot and clean
7) Once the fire is burning well close the door and reduce the air intake
8) Re-fuel little and often
9) Every time a log is added open the air control again until the fire is burning well and then return the control to normal

By running your stove in this way you will achieve maximum efficiency with minimum emissions

To find out more about using your Charnwood wood burning stove, please get in touch.

charnwoodstoves

Suitable for heating a wide variety of different living spaces, wood burning stoves are incredibly popular.

One of the most efficient ways to heat a property, a wood burning stove is capable of heating just a room or an entire home, while helping to keep your energy bills low. Functional and aesthetically pleasing, a wood burning stove also provides an attractive focal point in any living area.

But how do you clean your wood burning stove? During the winter months, when the majority of homeowners use their stove regularly, it’s easy for wood burning stoves to become dirty and in need of some TLC.

If you’re looking to clean your stove, we’ve put together our top tips on how to clean a wood burning stove to keep it looking as good as new.

Wood burning stove cleaning tips and tricks

Cleaning the surface

When it comes to cleaning your stove’s exterior surface and surrounding area, you can’t go far wrong with a soft brush, damp cloth and a vacuum cleaner. These tools are ideal for removing any soot and dirt and is best undertaken when your stove is unlit and cool.

How to clean glass on a wood burning stove

It is always important to burn well seasoned, dry logs on your stove but occasionally soot will accumulate on the glass of your wood stove, especially if you’ve been using firewood with a moisture content over 20%. The good news is, it can be easily removed by dipping a damp cloth into the soft ashes from the stove and simply wiping away the soot from the glass. You will also find there are a number of different wood burning stove cleaners on the market that you can use to clean the glass effectively. At Charnwood we offer our Schott dry wiper which works very well.

Empty your ash pan

When your wood burning stove is not in use it is worth emptying out the ash pan as well as the firebox completely . However, when it’s time to use your stove again during cooler evenings and colder months, it is useful to remember that lighting your fire on a bed of ash is much more effective.

Inspect the door and flue seals

When cleaning your wood burning stove, take the opportunity to inspect the rope seals on the doors and flue. It’s not uncommon for the seals to succumb to everyday wear and tear, so it’s important that these are checked frequently and changed if necessary.

A fresh spray of paint

Finally, if your stove is looking tired and unloved, don’t be afraid to get out the stove paint can.

The vast majority of Charnwood stoves are painted with heat resistant paint, however they can become scratched and pick up dust and dirt over time. Before painting your stove, you should make sure that the surface is dry, clean and free from any grease. Before spraying your stove we would recommend masking off the glass and handles and gently rubbing down any areas to be retouched with a Scotchbrite pad. You can purchase Charnwood high temperature stove paint from your local Charnwood stockist or on our spares shop. We offer a choice of eight colours and even full paint kits if you choose to ever change the colour of your stove completely.

 

Follow these tips and your wood burning stove should be good as new in no time at all.

 

To find out more about cleaning your wood burning stove, get in touch.

charnwoodstoves

When it comes to choosing wood for burning, many people are searching for something that is best in terms of sustainability. Wood is a viable energy source that is virtually carbon neutral and also a cost-effective heat source for many homes. To help you find the best firewood for your needs, we’ve put together this handy chart to show you the different types of firewood available and the benefits they each offer.

Which firewood should I choose?

When choosing your firewood, we would recommend opting for a hardwood as they are generally denser than softwoods and will produce more heat and burn longer. However, softwoods do light quicker and can be cheaper, but they are more resinous than hardwoods, meaning they are more likely to build up tar deposits in your flue.

Common hardwood species include beech and oak.

Common softwood species include cedar and pine.

Kiln dried logs are a good option as these guarantee a low moisture content. ‘Ready to burn’ logs should have less than 20 per cent moisture levels for optimum heat output and efficiency, and with kiln dried logs you can be sure you’re purchasing a consistently dried log that will provide the best source of heat. Naturally seasoned logs are generally less expensive but be sure to test the moisture content before burning. They will need to have been seasoned for at least one year, preferably two.

Which wood burns the longest?

There are several firewoods that burn for a sufficient amount of time, but oak and hawthorn are both favourable hardwoods to choose. These both burn slowly and produce a good source of heat.

Although hardwoods are a more efficient fuel source in terms of heat output and burning time, they can be harder to ignite from cold. This is when softwood kindling comes in handy, as it can help you get your fire up and running, before using the hardwood to fuel and maintain the slow burning fire.

The following chart is a common list of UK firewoods, showing you if they are hardwood or softwood and providing some detail of their characteristics.

 

Firewood Name Hard or softwood Comments Grade
Alder Hardwood Generally considered a low quality firewood as it burns quickly and provides little heat. Poor

 

Firewood Name Hard or softwood Comments Grade
Apple Hardwood Needs to be seasoned. Has a nice smell and burns well with a without sparking/spitting. Good
Ash Hardwood Considered one of the best firewoods. It has a low water content and can be burned green. It is still best when seasoned and will burn at a steady rate. Great
Beech Hardwood Beech has a high water content so will only burn well when seasoned. Good
Birch Hardwood Birch burns easily but also fast, so is best mixed with slower burning wood such as Elm or Oak. A great fire lighter is birch bark. Good -Great
Cedar Softwood Cedar provides a pleasant smell and provides lasting heat but with little flame. You can also burn small pieces unseasoned. Okay
Cherry Hardwood Needs to be seasoned to burn well. Okay-Good
Elm Hardwood A good firewood but due to its high water content, it must be seasoned well. It may need assistance from another faster burning wood such as Birch to keep it burning effectively. Okay-Good
Hawthorn Hardwood A good firewood that burns well. Good-Great
Hazel Hardwood Excellent firewood when seasoned. Burns fast but with no spitting. Great
Holly Hardwood A good firewood that can be burnt green. Good
Hornbeam Hardwood A good firewood that burns well. Good
Horse Chestnut Hardwood Horse chestnut spits a lot and is considered a low quality firewood. Okay
Larch Softwood Needs to be seasoned well. Spits excessively while it burns and can produce a lot of soot. Poor
Lime Hardwood Considered a low quality firewood. Okay
Oak Hardwood One of the best firewoods when seasoned well.  It provides lasting heat and burns at a slow rate. Great
Pear Hardwood Needs to be well seasoned. Burns well with a pleasant smell and without spitting. Good
Pine Softwood Pine burns well but spits a lot and can leave behind soot. It can act as a good softwood kindling. Poor
Plane Hardwood A usable firewood. Good

 

Firewood Name Hard or softwood Comments Grade
Poplar Softwood Considered a poor firewood and produces black smoke. Poor
Rowan Hardwood Considered a good firewood that burns well. Good
Spruce Softwood Considered a low quality firewood. Okay
Sweet Chestnut Hardwood Burns when seasoned but spits excessively. Not for use on an open fire. Poor-Okay
Sycamore (Maples) Hardwood Considered a good firewood that burns well. Good
Walnut Hardwood Considered a low quality firewood. Okay
Willow Hardwood Willow has a high water content so only burns well when seasoned properly. Okay
Yew Hardwood Considered a usable firewood. Okay-Good

charnwoodstoves

Used in many homes, firewood is a sustainable and cost-effective way to heat your property or outdoor space.

Whether you’re looking for suitable wood to burn in your stove or use in your fire pit on chilly summer evenings, it’s important to choose the right type of firewood. Not all types of firewood burn in the same way, so it’s important to understand the differences if you want the best possible results.

Here’s our guide to everything that you need to know about firewood.

What’s the difference between hardwood and softwood?

Firewood falls into two main categories – softwood and hardwood.

The main difference between hardwood and softwood is their reproduction and physical structure. For example, hardwoods are a lot denser than softwoods, meaning that they produce more heat and burn for longer.

On the other hand, softwoods are less dense, meaning they ignite faster and produce more smoke, making them more suited to outdoor fires.

Why choose hardwood?

Perfect for creating indoor fires in log burners and woodburning stoves, there are lots of different types of hardwood, including oak, birch and ash. Hardwood is especially useful for those looking to fuel a stove or heat a house.

Let’s take a closer look at the most popular types of hardwood:

Ash

Ash is particularly good for wood burning, as its properties allow it to burn on its own and produce an intense heat output, with a steady flame.

Oak

Oak is one of the most common types of hardwood used in homes, due to the fact that it is capable of burning for long periods of time and can be used efficiently with a different types of logs.

Birch

Available in black, yellow and white, birch can burn for a long period of time and can also be used as a natural fire starter.

Why choose softwood?

If you’re looking for firewood for an outdoor fire, softwood is a much better option than hardwood – it ignites far more quickly, meaning its ideal for campfires and kindling.

Softwood also seasons more rapidly than hardwood. There are lots of different types of softwood to choose from, including pine, cedar and larch.

Here’s a closer look at their properties. 

Larch

Low maintenance larch is the hardest of the softwood family and requires intense heat to burn effectively.

Pine

Easy to light and burn, pine produces an impressive flame and is great to use as a fire starter. It’s important to note that pine should only ever be used in outdoor environments due to the fact that it burns incredibly fast.

Cedar

Finally, cedar produces a distinct crackling sound with a small flame. One of the main advantages of this type of softwood is that it can be burned unseasoned. It also gives off a lovely wood burning smell.

To find out more about the best type of firewood to use with your Charnwood wood burning stove, please get in touch, we’re always on hand to offer help and support.

charnwoodstoves

When it comes to choosing firewood for burning on your stove or creating an outdoor fire, there’s plenty to consider. The best results rely on opting for the best type of firewood for your needs.

So, to give you a helping hand, we’ve created a guide to everything you need to know about firewood.

First and foremost, there are two different types of firewood, falling under two distinct categories – hardwood and softwood.

What is hardwood?

Hardwoods are denser than soft woods, making them ideal for creating indoor fires. Popular hardwoods include oak, birch and ash. All are ideal for heating your home.

Hardwood is best suited for indoor environments as it produces more heat and burns for longer.

What is softwood?

Softwoods are less dense and ignite faster. This makes them far better for fuelling outdoor fires, as they can produce a little more smoke which can be unpleasant if they are burned indoors.

Again, there are lots of different types of softwood, including pine, cedar and larch. The best type of softwood for your fire will depend on your needs and how you plan to use it.

Seasoning your wood

Once you’ve chosen your firewood, you’ll need to ensure it is seasoned correctly before you attempt to light up your fire.

Seasoning involves ensuring that your wood is properly dried out in order to get the best out of your fire. Wood that contains moisture or is not fully dry won’t burn efficiently and will be slow to ignite. Suitable wood should have a moisture content of less than 20%.

There are a few ways to check whether or not your wood is correctly seasoned. For example, if your wood is light and has cracks on the ends, it’s highly likely that it has dried out. Another way to check is to examine the colour of your wood. Wood is usually yellow, grey or deep brown when it is dry. At Charnwood we do offer a pronged moisture metre that can be inserted in the log to give you an accurate moisture reading.

If buying wood in smaller volumes look out for the Woodsure ‘Ready to Burn label’ which guarantees a moisture content less than 20%.

Split up your logs

A fire will burn far more effectively if you split your logs into halves or quarters. This will help your wood to dry quicker too. As a general rule of thumb, you should try and cut your wood up into pieces that are between three to six inches. For larger outdoor fire pits or wood furnaces, they can be slightly larger.

Avoid storing firewood in your home

Finally, you should avoid storing large quantities of firewood in your home. Why? Firewood is notorious for being the home of choice for ants and other creepy crawlies, so it’s not a good idea to bring your logs into your home, unless you want them to bring their extra guests in with them!

Instead, create a dedicated storage area for your firewood outside such as a woodshed, a ventilated storage container or even a dedicated area protected by a natural bark barrier. Your wood should also be kept well ventilated season to season.

If you have any questions about firewood or any other aspect of using your wood burner or stove, please get in touch.

charnwoodstoves

As the heart of the home, the kitchen is the perfect place to pay attention to when it comes to your interior design. If you love to spend time whipping up a culinary storm and dining together as a family, it makes sense that you give the kitchen the touch of TLC it deserves when it comes to decorating. In the name of creative inspiration, we’re here to help. Today, we’re looking at 3 reasons you should consider bringing a fireplace into your kitchen design - offering tips and advice along the way so you’re left with a space the whole family simply loves spending time in.

1. It can be stunning focal feature

Unlike most other rooms in the home, the kitchen serves several practical purposes, and this means that the appliances often act as the focus points in this space. While you might have an attractive looking fridge or top-of-the-range washing machine, it’s unlikely that you want to draw attention to functional appliances when you’re considering interior decor.

By bringing in a fireplace, you can accessorise the borders and hearth with fireplace tiles to completely transform the look of your kitchen and make the fireside the focal point. A wood burning stove, acts as an eye-catching feature in its own right. However, you can always add the finishing touch by having a basket of wood and any pokers or accessories beside the stove.

2. It will provide warmth in winter

When the winter months set in, home cooked food is what most of us crave. But preparing to spend potentially hours in a frosty kitchen doesn’t hold much appeal, especially when you can be sitting snug and cosy with your throws by the fire in your living room – so how do you remedy that? Bring the fire into the kitchen, of course!

Heating your home using your kitchen fireplace can also be a way to keep energy costs low. Most modern stoves today are highly efficient and very clean burning. From wood pellets and firewood to mineral fuels, there are several options available to you when it comes to using your fire, so you can spend some time figuring out the best option for your home.

3. It will create an atmosphere

Last but not least on our list of reasons for adding a fireplace to your kitchen is the atmosphere that this can create. A fireplace can add character to a room that has perhaps previously been all about being functional. While it still provides a purpose, it can be an attractive centrepiece even when not in use.

If you’re lucky enough to have space for a dining table and chairs in your kitchen, a fireplace could be the perfect finishing touch. In the winter evenings, you can light it up and allow the warm glow of the fire to bathe the kitchen in an ambient light as you eat together as a family. In summer when the fire isn’t needed, use the hearth to display candles and freshly picked flowers.

By choosing to have a fireplace in your kitchen, you can create a truly unique focal point that is practical, yet gives off bags of aesthetic appeal.

Author bio:

Suhayl Laher works at Tiles Direct, one of the UK’s largest independent tile distributors and retailers – bringing design inspiration to homeowners, architects and developers.

charnwoodstoves

Charnwood Cove 1 wood burning stove appears in a temporary exhibition by artist Virginia Overton at Jay Jopling’s White Cube Bermondsey contemporary art gallery

Located in the centre of the building in an 81m² top-lit space, the Cove 1 stove will burn wood supplied from logs stacked on the opposite wall throughout the five-week exhibition. The stove, says the gallery’s website, will “fill the space with a scent of wood and the sound of crackling, contributing to the feeling of being in a welcoming place.”

The 4kW stove is Defra approved for London’s smoke control area and was installed by London wood burning specialists Stoake.

Virginia Overton’s exhibition is situated in the North Galleries and the 9 x 9 x 9 space and will run from September 30 to November 6 2016. For more information about the artist and her exhibition please visit: http://whitecube.com/exhibitions/virginia_overton_bermondsey_2016/