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Nothing quite compares to the roaring flames of a wood burner in the comfort of your own home.

A wood burner not only creates the perfect ambience on a cold winters day, but is also a superb focal point in the home.

However, before making this long-term investment and enjoying its many benefits, there are several factors to explore which will determine whether a wood burner is suitable for your home. From installation to size and fitting, we’ve compiled our top tips.

Can you install a wood burner if you have no chimney?

It is possible to have a wood burner installed in your home without a chimney. To achieve this, the wood burner must have a twin skin insulated flue system installed.

Before buying your wood burner, we would recommend a visit from an HETAS qualified heating engineer. They will visit your home and inspect the area where you would like your wood burner installed. They will offer expert advice on many elements, including building regulations, required flue systems and insulation.

Can I install a wood burner myself?

The installation of a wood burner is a highly specialised job and should be carried out by a trained professional. It is by no means a project to take on yourself, as if it is done incorrectly, it could be very dangerous.

If the stove and flue are not connected properly, or if the flue isn’t installed correctly, it can lead to harmful fumes entering the room, which can pose a significant safety risk to yourself and your family.

We recommend a visit from an HETAS qualified installer, who will be able to safely install your flue system. By using a registered installer, you have the confidence that you are receiving expert, trustworthy advice and your flue will be installed properly. A correctly installed wood burner will be safe, efficient and long-lasting.

Here at Charnwood, we work with a network of specialist installers, so you can be safe in the knowledge that your wood burner will not only be fitted correctly, but will be installed to last long-term.

How to line a chimney for a wood burner

A chimney liner is a stainless-steel tube that connects the top of the pipe that protrudes from a wood burner to the chimney pot. While there are several ways to line a chimney, fitting a chimney liner is the most common and cost-effective.

Lining a chimney for a wood burner is a two-person job, involving working at height and several steps:

Before fitting the liner, ensure you first sweep the chimney.

Remove the chimney pot.

Go to the roof and take a length of rope measuring five metres longer than your chimney height with a weight on the end and carefully drop this down your chimney.

A substantial amount of dust may fall down the chimney at this point, so ensure a dust mask, goggles and protective clothing are worn.

Once the rope is down the chimney, tie off the rope to prevent losing it down the chimney.

Bring the chimney liner to the roof and check the arrows to ensure it is the right way up.

Take care when holding the chimney liner and cover the ends of the liner with gaffer tape for added protection.

Attach the flex adapter, then fix three sets of wires to the liner adapter which enable you to attach the length of rope.

Put the closing plate over the top end of the liner and clamp the top fixing clamp.

Gently feed the liner into the chimney and straighten it to avoid any curls inside the flue.

Once the liner is in place, move the fixing clamp down the liner until it is resting on top of the chimney and supports the weight of the liner at the necessary height.

Cut any excess liner using a hacksaw so that around half the height of the chimney pot remains.

Make the area waterproof by making a mix of sand, cement and integral waterproofer.

Wet down the chimney, chimney pot, closing plate and end of the liner, before applying the cement mixture.

Wipe down and add a cowl to the chimney.

Connect the stove to the chimney liner adaptor with some rigid flue and allow 24 hours before lighting your stove.

Alternatively, a local registered installer will be able to fit the chimney liner for you. Contact us for further information.

How much should I pay for a wood burner to be fitted?

While each wood burner and its requirements are unique, you can expect to pay from £700 upwards for your wood burner to be fitted.

What size wood burner should I get?

It is essential that you measure the size of the room where you’d like your wood burner ahead of making a purchase. This will ensure that you buy the correct sized stove with the right amount of heat for the room where it will be installed.

If the wood burner gives off too much heat for the room, the space will become unpleasantly hot and the plaster around the stove may crack. Too low and you will not get the desired warmth needed within your chosen space.

As a rough guide, we recommend 1kW of heat output will heat 14 cubic metres.

How close can my TV be to my wood burner?

If you are considering placing your TV on the wall above your wood burner, we would strongly recommend contacting your TV manufacturer to determine how much heat your TV is able to withstand. You may also want to consult the operating manual for further information.

Contact Charnwood today

To find out more about your next wood burner and for advice around suitability for your home, contact Charnwood today. Our friendly, expert team are on hand and more than happy to answer any queries you may have.

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With the sudden drop in temperature and an autumn chill in the air, nothing beats a cosy evening nestled by your wood burning stove.

But as we head towards the winter months, your wood burner could need some TLC before its ready to be used more regularly.

To help keep your wood burner well maintained in readiness for those long winter nights, we’ve compiled our tips on how to clean wood burner glass alongside other upkeep advice.

How to keep wood burner glass clean

Your wood burner is not only a source of warmth, it is also a focal point within your home. Many modern generally feature clean-burn air wash which naturally keep the glass clean. However when used regularly, soot may build up on the glass door, which can drastically reduce the view of the fire. The most common cause of this is when wood with a moisture content higher than 20% is burnt or if a burning log is touching the glass.

Here are some do’s and don’ts on how to keep wood burner glass clean.

Do…

Use a damp crumpled paper towel or newspaper, dip it in fine wood ash and use this to rub the stove glass clean.

If there is substantial build up on the glass, burn a high temperature fire in the wood burning stove before you try to clean the glass. Ensure you have plenty of well-seasoned wood in your wood burner to create a fire of a high temperature.

Make sure you use a wood stove glass cleaner, or a ceramic stove top cleaner.

Ensure you wait until the wood burner glass is cool before you attempt to clean it.

Clean your wood burner glass on a regular basis to prevent a build-up of soot.

Don’t…

Never attempt to clean your wood burner glass when there is a fire burning inside the stove or the surface is hot.

Avoid spraying water on hot wood burner glass – this could cause the glass to crack or shatter.

Never use sharp objects or abrasive cleaners to clean your wood burner glass – these could damage and scratch the surface of the glass.

How to clean a wood burner

When it comes to cleaning your wood burner, there are many interior and exterior elements to consider.

Ensure exterior surfaces are cleaned with a soft brush, damp cloth or a vacuum cleaner. These will effectively remove any soot and dirt when the stove is cool.

Take the time to empty out the ash pan and firebox completely when your wood burner is not being used. Inspect the rope seals on the doors and flue, as it is not uncommon for these to become damaged through everyday wear and tear.

Find out more wood burning stove cleaning tips and tricks in our blog: How to clean your wood burning stove.

Why is my wood burner smoking?

If your wood burner is smoking, there could be several reasons, including:

A blocked chimney

The wrong fuel is being used

An issue with the air pressure in the room

A problem with the draw of your chimney

A cold weather snap

To stop your wood burner from smoking, you need to ensure you have the correct air pressure, no chimney blockages and are burning the correct fuel. If you have any further questions about your smoking wood burner, contact us today.

Why does my wood burner smell?

If your wood burner is emitting an unpleasant smell, it is unlikely that this is coming from the wood burner or stove itself. The smell is more likely being caused by other factors, including:

The stove is new and requires a ‘break in’ period

The fire is releasing too much smoke

Burning damp wood which contains too much moisture

Burning polluted wood

The fire isn’t hot enough

Blocked chimney or flue

Insufficient chimney size which cannot easily remove waste smoke and gases

Wet weather

If the weather is much lower than usual and smoke and gases cannot leave the home properly

Reduced airflow

 

Why is my wood burner not getting hot?

If your wood burner is not getting hot, this could be due to a variety of reasons:

• The draft on the stove is poor – draft on the stove is needed to suck air from the stove out of your home. If the waste gas is unable to escape, fresh air won’t be getting to the fire and this will prevent the stove from heating. Test the draft by lighting a piece of paper on one end and placing it under the flue outlet inside your stove. If the smoke disappears, the draft should work effectively when the fire starts.

• The air vents need opening – if the air vents aren’t open enough, it will prevent oxygen getting to the fire. Open up the air vents and create a larger supply of oxygen to enable to the fire to burn through the wood more quickly.

• The air vents are open too much – if the air vents are opened too much, the stove may not get hot. While the air vents should be opened fully when the fire is being lit to maximise oxygen levels, these can be gradually closed down as the fire gets hotter to ensure too much air isn’t getting to the fire.

• Lack of secondary combustion – this process involves maximising heat from burning wood by burning off waste gases from the fire. Secondary combustion will only occur when a higher temperature is reached.

• Fire incorrectly lit/built – if a fire is built and lit incorrectly, it will prevent the stove from getting hot. Lay crumpled pieces of paper on the bed of the stove to help encourage the fire to spread to the wood. Softwood kindling can then be placed on top of the newspaper, followed by smaller logs once the fire has caught.

• Wet wood – if your wood is too wet, the excess moisture will prevent your wood burner from getting hot. We recommend a 20 per cent or lower moisture content threshold for firewood. If your wood contains more moisture than this, it will need to be dried out for a further season before if can be used.

Find out more in our blog: How to use a wood burning stove.

How often should I sweep my wood burner chimney?

We recommend that wood burner chimneys are cleaned at least once a year. This should take place when the temperature drops in the cooler months before the wood burner is used more regularly.

Contact Charnwood today

To find out more about keeping your wood burner well maintained, contact Charnwood today. Our friendly, expert team are on hand and more than happy to answer any queries you may have.

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If you are already the proud owner of a wood burner, or are considering making a purchase, you will not be disappointed. A wood burner is a superb addition to the home and an impressive focal point.

As winter approaches and the nights begin to draw in, what better way to spend chilly evenings than being nestled up next to your wood burning stove?

Before you fire up your wood burner and use it more regularly though, the Charnwood experts have compiled their tips on how to light a wood burner alongside other top tips, so you can get the absolute most out of your wood burner.

How to use a wood burner

If you are considering a wood burner purchase, it is crucial to ensure your desired stove is suitable for your home. We strongly recommend that a site survey is carried out by an experienced stove installer in the first instance before you make a purchase. Use our stove calculator to find out if your room is suitable.

How to make a fire in a wood burner

There are several stages to making a successful fire in a wood burner. If a fire is built and lit incorrectly, it can prevent the stove from getting hot. Follow these steps to make a successful wood burner fire:

Firstly you will need to ensure your wood is well seasoned and dry with a moisture content of less than 20% – if buying wood in smaller volumes look out for the Woodsure ‘Ready to Burn label’ which guarantees this.

When lighting your stove we recommend the top down method.

1) Leave some ash – the most efficient way to light a wood burning stove is to leave a little bit of ash from previous fires. However, you should still ensure the majority of the ash is cleaned out to avoid blocking air circulation.
2) Place 2-3 smaller logs on the stove bed
3) On top of this build a stack of 6-8 softwood kindling sticks
4) Then place a natural fire lighter inside
5) Fully open the air control as this will maximise the supply of oxygen in the wood burner needed to get the fire going.
6) Light the fire lighter and close the door but leave it slightly a jar
7) This helps to heat the chimney flue and burn hot and clean
8) Once the fire is burning well close the door and reduce the air intake
9) Re-fuel little and often
10) Every time a log is added open the air control again until the fire is burning well and then return the control to normal

By running your stove in this way you will achieve maximum efficiency with minimum emissions

How hot does a wood burner get?

Most wood burners range in temperature and can reach 190 – 343 degrees Celsius (375 – 650 degrees Fahrenheit). However, how hot a wood burner gets can depend on several factors including poor draft on the stove, air vents left closed or not open enough, incorrectly built/lit fire and use of wet wood.

How many logs do I need to put in a wood burner?

It is important not to overload your wood burner with logs, as this will mean the fire does not have enough oxygen to burn effectively. For a constant heat, have one or two logs in your wood burner at once.

How to get maximum heat from wood burner

There are several factors that could prevent your wood burner from achieving maximum heat, including:
The type of wood that is being burnt.
The moisture content of the wood.
How effectively the air supply to the fire is controlled.
How well the fire is maintained.

Achieve the maximum heat from your wood burner by:

Using softwoods to quickly get the fire started.
Using harder woods once the fire has started to produce more heat for longer periods.
Ensuring all wood burned is dry and doesn’t contain large amounts of moisture (as mentioned earlier we recommend a 20 per cent or lower moisture content threshold for firewood).
Periodically adding a few pieces of wood, rather than waiting for the flame to die down or adding large amounts of wood in one go.
Using air vents correctly to control airflow to the fire.
Having your flue cleaned and maintained regularly.
Cleaning and maintaining your wood burner stove regularly.
Ensuring your room has adequate ventilation to give the fire an oxygen supply.

How to keep a wood burner going

The below tips will help make a wood stove burn for longer:
Avoid using wet wood in your wood burning stove.
Reduce the air coming through the air vents to make the fire last longer.
A stove that contains cast iron elements are better for heat efficiency and will keep a fire going.
If you would like to find out more about wood burning stove cleaning tips and tricks in our blog, read: How to clean your wood burning stove.

What trees are the best to burn on a wood burner?

The best wood for burning on a wood burner are:
• Ash
• Oak
• Birch
• Beech
• Cherry
• Sycamore

How to put out a wood burner

Safely put out your wood burner by following these steps:
Starve the flames of oxygen by ensuring the stove door is completely closed.
Close all air vents and wait until the flames have died down to embers.
Wearing heat-resistant gloves, open the door and spread the remaining embers/pieces of wood using a fire poker.
Once the stove is cooled, sweep away any remaining ashes. An ash carrier can be a useful piece of equipment to assist in this.

Discover further cleaning and maintenance tips in our blog: How to clean wood burner glass.

Contact Charnwood today

To find out more about how to light your wood burner and keeping it well maintained, contact Charnwood today. Our friendly, expert team are on hand and more than happy to answer any queries you may have.

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The importance of wall protection when installing a freestanding stove

As the cold season is fast approaching, many homeowners are rushing to prepare for the winter, and one effective way is to get your fireplace ready. As you will be aware, the fireplace serves to keep you and your family warm and comfortable during the winter months. Whether it’s a wood-burning or multi-fuel burner, it produces controlled heat that can warm your home’s space.

However, did you know that a vital part of the overall equation in your wood-burning stove is the heat shield? As the name suggests, it is typically installed behind a freestanding stove and it is designed to protect your wall from heat damage. However, while most wood stoves come with heat shields, some don’t have one.

In this article, we’ll specifically cover how to set clearances and install heat shields for wood stoves:

Have adequate clearances

When it comes to a wood stove, there are two key safety features you must keep in mind – sufficient clearance and wall material behind. A properly installed and maintained wood stove can ensure the safety of your appliance. Yet, inadequate clearances can be extremely dangerous for your home.

The Fire Protection Association recommends that the common radiant-type stove must be spaced out at least 900mm (36 inches) from a combustible wall although different wood burning stove manufacturers will offer their own tested safe distances. This is extremely important as your wood stove can get very hot when in operation. As a result, combustible materials too close to the stove can catch fire. By cheating on your wood stove’s clearances, you can potentially create a fire hazard.

Reduce wood stove clearances

On the other hand, know that you can reduce the clearance of your wood stove without compromising your home safety. Although you cannot completely eliminate the clearance, you can significantly reduce it. There’s only one solution to this, and that is to install a properly constructed heat shield.

For your reference, there are various types of heat shields you may want to consider for your wood stove. Be sure to follow the guidelines set forth by the HETAS for the heat shielding requirements, from the appliance selection down to its actual installation.

Vitreous Enamel heat shields

When it comes to wood stoves, installing a wall mounted heat shield is an excellent way to reduce clearance and promote home safety. A vitreous enamel heat shield is a great solution.

Vlaze Heat Shields are designed to protect and enhance the wall behind a wood burning stove creating a modern fireplace.

The vitreous enamel panel features a dual skin that provides thermal protection and an effective convection system that distributes heat back into the room. Using their rail mounted system the heat shield is quick and easy to install and is available in 3 sizes and over 30 luxurious glazed finishes. When installed on a wall the shield reduces the stoves distance to the face of the panel to 95mm and in the case of a Charnwood stove to just 75mm – a vast improvement on HETAS regulations.

Conclusion

At this point, you now know several valuable tips for your wood stove. As mentioned above, be sure to have adequate clearance or reduce wood stove clearances by installing heat shields. Furthermore, it’s best to deal with a reliable manufacturer when purchasing and installing a heat shield for your wood-burning stove. Doing so will help you make the most of your stove, protect your home, and keep you warm during the cold season!

 

 

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Charnwood stoves specified for Danh Vo's Chicxulub show

We were recently asked to supply six Ecodesign Ready wood burning stoves for a show at The White Cube Gallery in Bermondsey, London. The work ‘Live Free or Die’ is part of artist Danh Vo’s exhibition, Chicxulub. Stacks of firewood are used to fuel six Charnwood Skye 7 stoves installed throughout the gallery, in return giving off heat and an atmospheric light which illuminates the space.

The stoves are placed on gloss black vitreous enamel Vlaze hearth plates

The show runs from 11 September – 2 November 2020 Click here for further details 

Stoves were installed by London stove specialists Stoake  

 

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Used in households across the world, wood burning stoves are powerful heating solutions that can provide warmth and charm to virtually any home.

Far more efficient and environmentally friendly than other sources of heat, a wood burning stove is a sound investment and is a great option if you’re looking to replace an older, open style fire. Charnwood’s wide range of Ecodesign Ready stoves are up to 90% more efficient than a traditional open fires and older stoves.

How does a wood burning stove work?

Wood burning stoves offer exceptional reliability and can be used to heat properties of all shapes and sizes, as well as individual rooms. They remain one of the most energy efficient ways to heat a property, using renewable and locally sourced fuels to generate heat.

How to use a wood burning stove

A wood burning stove generates a great deal of heat, so we would recommend you wear protective gloves when operating it.

One of the keys to a successful fire is to ensure your wood is dry with a moisture level of less than 20%.

Start by making a small ‘Jenga’ stack of kindling around a firelighter on top of 2 small logs. A top tip is to use a natural fire lighter as this generates better results with a cleaner burn.

Once you’ve done this, you can then light your fire. To get the fire started you should always leave the stove door slightly cracked open and the air lever pulled all the way out to allow oxygen to flow over the kindling. If you do need to re-fuel the fire at any point, simply open the air supply lever and the door to the stove, then place your new logs on your stack of burning wood. We recommend loading little and often.

How to install a wood burning stove

In the UK it is important your stove is fitted by a HETAS registered engineer or fitted according to Building Regulations (document J) and signed off by Building Control.

We would always recommend purchasing a stove through one of our official Charnwood stockists who will either offer a full installation service or recommend a registered installer. We have carefully handpicked our dealerships to ensure they provide you with the best advice, service and, crucially, after sales support. Stoves purchased through this route also qualify for our 10 year dealer backed guarantee and a 1 year no quibble guarantee on all consumable parts (such as door seals, firebricks and glass).

There are many things to consider when it comes to wood burning stove installation, including whether you have an existing chimney breast or fireplace, distances to combustible materials, the size of your room, the age of your property and how well insulated your home is.

Your official Charnwood stockist will, in most cases, carry out a full survey of your fireplace and  will need to know a number of things about your property including if you’re installing the stove in a smoke-controlled area. They will also recommend the right sized stove for your property and ensure that the model you choose complies with current and future regulations.

If you’re considering buying a wood burning stove, get in touch with our skilled and experienced team.

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When it comes to choosing fuel for your wood burning stove, it’s important that you burn the right wood. This will not only ensure that your stove burns stronger and for longer, but it will also help reduce your fuel costs as a result.

Burning the wrong type of wood can increase fuel costs and damage the internal parts of your stove. In some cases, it can even cause irreparable damage to the stove body or flue system, so it’s important you understand what type of wood will work with your appliance.

Here’s a closer look at what you should burn in your wood burning stove.

Hardwood firewood

Hardwood is a great fuel for wood burning stoves. With a variety of different types available, including ash, birch, maple and oak, as well as the wood from the vast majority of fruit trees, hardwood firewood is renowned for burning for longer periods, while generating lots of heat.

Another advantage of hardwoods is that they are generally cleaner to handle, making them a great option for your stove.

Softwood firewood

A lot cheaper than hardwood, softwood can also be used in your wood burning stove. Fir is the most popular choice, although there are plenty of other options, including balsam, pine, spruce, cedar, alder, tamarack and poplar.

How do softwoods burn compared to hardwood?

Softwoods tend to burn faster than hardwood and leave a finer ash behind. They can also be messy to handle and are renowned for causing a build-up of tar in your chimney. Spruce, pine and balsam can be particularly difficult to handle.

What’s the best firewood for generating heat energy?

There are lots of different types of firewood and many of them can be categorised based on their performance. For example, the following types of firewood typically generate the best amount of heat energy:

• Apple
• Birch (Yellow)
• Red oak
• White ash
• Maple (Sugar)
• White oak
• Beech (American)
• Hickory (Shagbark)
• Ironwood

Whether you opt for hardwood or softwood, always make sure that it is totally dry before you use it. Never attempt to burn green wood as it will produce less heat and a lot more smoke.

Make sure your wood is dried, seasoned and stored correctly so you can enjoy optimum heat with low fuel costs. Your wood should always be stacked in a cool dry place with efficient air circulation and covered on the top only. If you can, rotate your wood as much as possible and always burn older, dryer wood first.

As a general rule of thumb, hardwood and softwood should have a moisture content of less than 20 percent if it’s being used for burning.

If you have any questions about your Charnwood wood burning stove, please get in touch.

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More people than ever before are using a wood burning stove to heat their homes.

With the ability to quickly and effectively heat up a single room or even an entire home, wood burning stoves are one of the most efficient ways to heat a space. Of course, wood burning stoves also look great and can add an exciting focal point to any room.

If you’re thinking about investing in a wood burning stove, you’re in the right place. Here’s our guide to everything you need to know about using one.

Correct installation

We always recommend that you buy your stove through an official Charnwood stockist, where the installation and after-sales support will be of a standard approved by us.
It is important your stove is installed by either by a HETAS registered engineer or in accordance to building regulations (refer to document J https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/combustion-appliances-and-fuel-storage-systems-approved-document-j )

All official Charnwood Stockists will offer this service and by purchasing through this channel you will also qualify for our 10 year dealer backed guarantee.

Familiarise yourself with our stove instruction guide

First and foremost, when you are having your wood burning stove installed, it’s important to familiarise yourself with our instruction guide, so that you know how to get the best from your stove.

Choosing the right fuel

Next, you’ll need to choose the right fuel for your stove, either a hardwood or a softwood fuel. Failure to use the correct fuel can affect how long your fire burns, increase fuel costs, and damage the internal parts of your woodburning stove. It can even cause damage to the stove body or flue system.

To light your stove we recommend the top down method.

1) Clear the grate of ash then Place 2-3 smaller logs on the stove bed
2) On top of this build a stack of 6-8 kindling sticks
3) Then place a natural fire lighter inside
4) Fully open the air control for maximum air intake and a quick and easy ignition
5) Light the fire lighter and close the door but leave it slightly a jar
6) This helps to heat the chimney flue and burn hot and clean
7) Once the fire is burning well close the door and reduce the air intake
8) Re-fuel little and often
9) Every time a log is added open the air control again until the fire is burning well and then return the control to normal

By running your stove in this way you will achieve maximum efficiency with minimum emissions

To find out more about using your Charnwood wood burning stove, please get in touch.

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Suitable for heating a wide variety of different living spaces, wood burning stoves are incredibly popular.

One of the most efficient ways to heat a property, a wood burning stove is capable of heating just a room or an entire home, while helping to keep your energy bills low. Functional and aesthetically pleasing, a wood burning stove also provides an attractive focal point in any living area.

But how do you clean your wood burning stove? During the winter months, when the majority of homeowners use their stove regularly, it’s easy for wood burning stoves to become dirty and in need of some TLC.

If you’re looking to clean your stove, we’ve put together our top tips on how to clean a wood burning stove to keep it looking as good as new.

Wood burning stove cleaning tips and tricks

Cleaning the surface

When it comes to cleaning your stove’s exterior surface and surrounding area, you can’t go far wrong with a soft brush, damp cloth and a vacuum cleaner. These tools are ideal for removing any soot and dirt and is best undertaken when your stove is unlit and cool.

How to clean glass on a wood burning stove

It is always important to burn well seasoned, dry logs on your stove but occasionally soot will accumulate on the glass of your wood stove, especially if you’ve been using firewood with a moisture content over 20%. The good news is, it can be easily removed by dipping a damp cloth into the soft ashes from the stove and simply wiping away the soot from the glass. You will also find there are a number of different wood burning stove cleaners on the market that you can use to clean the glass effectively. At Charnwood we offer our Schott dry wiper which works very well.

Empty your ash pan

When your wood burning stove is not in use it is worth emptying out the ash pan as well as the firebox completely . However, when it’s time to use your stove again during cooler evenings and colder months, it is useful to remember that lighting your fire on a bed of ash is much more effective.

Inspect the door and flue seals

When cleaning your wood burning stove, take the opportunity to inspect the rope seals on the doors and flue. It’s not uncommon for the seals to succumb to everyday wear and tear, so it’s important that these are checked frequently and changed if necessary.

A fresh spray of paint

Finally, if your stove is looking tired and unloved, don’t be afraid to get out the stove paint can.

The vast majority of Charnwood stoves are painted with heat resistant paint, however they can become scratched and pick up dust and dirt over time. Before painting your stove, you should make sure that the surface is dry, clean and free from any grease. Before spraying your stove we would recommend masking off the glass and handles and gently rubbing down any areas to be retouched with a Scotchbrite pad. You can purchase Charnwood high temperature stove paint from your local Charnwood stockist or on our spares shop. We offer a choice of eight colours and even full paint kits if you choose to ever change the colour of your stove completely.

 

Follow these tips and your wood burning stove should be good as new in no time at all.

 

To find out more about cleaning your wood burning stove, get in touch.