charnwoodstoves

At Charnwood we are always interested in the latest trend reports for the home and with 2020’s lockdown forcing Brits to spend more time indoors than ever before, an interesting new survey from Tiles Direct reveals how homeowners got creative with their interiors (and gardens) this year.

The online tile retailer quizzed over 400 Brits* if and where they’d donned their overalls and whipped out their paint rollers this year.

Of those surveyed, just 7.8% hadn’t redecorated or renovated any room of their home – suggesting that homeowners have been unable to endure lockdown in outdated or off-trend interiors.

The great outdoors

Accounting for 29.2% of the overall vote, the garden came out on top as the most popular spot for home renovations this year. Here at Charnwood we certainly found this to be true with our new outdoor Charnwood Fire Balls selling incredibly well.

With the UK’s nationwide lockdown lasting from 16th March to 1st June, this data comes as little surprise – with the sunny weather leaving cooped-up homeowners desperate for a taste of the great outdoors. Our sister company had great success with their newly launched Adapt Outdoor Kitchen units.

Garden renovations were most popular among 25-34 and 35-44 year olds – the demographics most likely to have younger children – and with some schools being shut for as long as 7 months throughout 2020, who can blame them?

No place like home

Stepping through the front door of Brits’ homes, the living room was the next most popular spot for a little interior design TLC, with 28.4% of respondents revitalising their living room in 2020. We saw a sharp increase in sales of our wood burning stoves and accessories such as toasting forks and basketware. Our fireplace products such as our Vlaze heat shields and hearth plates also faired well.

Homeowners weren’t struck with inspiration from the off, though – instead turning to the internet, with living room related searches being among the most commonly searched interior-based keywords in Google this year.

Taking the third and fourth spots were kitchens and bedrooms, accounting for 19.5% and 19.8% of the vote respectively. With a mammoth 46.6% of the UK workforce working from home in April, and current government advice continuing to encourage flexible home working wherever possible, we’ve seen these rooms serve as part-time living spaces and part-time office spaces.

With this in mind, it’s little surprise that home workers have chosen to transform these interiors into something a little more inspiring.

Towards the end of 2020 we launched our stove pods: a quick-to-fit instant fireplace incorporating a chamber and hearth. We were taken by surprise at the popularity but are subsequently discovering that many of these sales are for home offices and sheds and cabins situated in the garden.

With 16.5% of the vote, the bathroom was still a relatively popular spot for home renovations in 2020, with concerns surrounding hygiene racing up the list of Brits’ DIY priorities.This is an area that again our sister company Vlaze have seen an increase in with their shower and wetroom panelling

The dining room was the least popular room for redecoration this year, accounting for just 12.4% of the total vote. With social distancing guidelines still in place and household mixing continuing to be discouraged or banned, one of the home’s main social hubs was unsurprisingly shown little love this year.

The lockdown lowdown  

Tiles Direct also analysed their top 500 site searches in 2020 to identify the most in-demand tile types of the last year and pinpoint common themes surrounding users’ choice of shape, colour and material or finish. We always like to keep on top of fire surround trends so these results throw up some interesting data which is reflected in many of the Charnwood installations we have seen shared on our social channels.

When it came to tile shapes, some of the latest interior fads came out on top:

1. Herringbone
2. Hexagon
3. Metro
4. Mosaic
5. Chevron

Colours threw up some surprises, with homeowners opting for bright and vibrant over timeless and traditional.:

1. Pink
2. Green
3. Blue
4. White
5. Gold

While our stoves colour range is relatively subtle we do offer a green and blue that are becoming increasingly popular with customers

Luxurious longevity was the name of the game when it came to materials and finishes:

1. Marble
2. Terrazzo
3. Quarry
4. Slate
5. Wood

*This data was gathered in December 2020 and includes responses from 409 people in the UK.

charnwoodstoves

If you are already the proud owner of a boiler stove, or are considering a future purchase, you will not be disappointed. Not only does a boiler stove offer a highly efficient heat source, it provides a homely ambience and a decorative and stylish focal point in your home.

If you are considering the cost-effective and energy efficient move to a boiler stove but need further information, we can help.

We have compiled all you need to know about boiler stoves, their benefits and the must-knows of this stylish and eco-conscious heating choice.

What is a boiler stove?

A boiler stove is an appliance that burns wood or mineral fuels to generate hot water and power radiators. The range of Charnwood boiler stoves are specifically designed for those wishing to run a full central heating system.

What are the benefits of a boiler stove?

Boiler stoves are a valuable addition to any home, and boast numerous benefits, including:

•  Option to link to your existing central heating system (run by oil or gas) to reduce home heating bills

•  Option to link to combi boilers, underfloor heating or solar thermal panels

•  Reduced carbon footprint

•  Looks stylish and inviting in the home

•  Available in modern or traditional designs

•  Used to heat water throughout the home

•  Generates and stores heat

How a boiler stove works

A boiler stove works by transferring heat from the burning fuel into water. This can then be piped and transferred where it is needed in the household. It can be used for both heating and/or domestic hot water.

A boiler stove can provide wood or coal fired central heating. It does this by being connected to the house heating system, usually radiators. The heat from the burning wood is then pumped around the house. If your house uses underfloor heating, the boiler stove is instead connected to a hot water tank and the underfloor heating is connected to this.

A boiler stove can be used to power your central heating system as well as providing hot water. This system will require input and knowledge from an experienced heating engineer.

Contact us for more information regarding your central heating and hot water from your wood boiler stove.

Using a back boiler for central heating

The term back boiler refers to the way in which the boiler is incorporated into the firebox itself.

It replaces the firebricks withing the stove creating an effective way to transfer heat from the fire to water.

How to choose a boiler stove

When it comes to selecting a boiler stove for your home, there are several key factors to consider:

•  Which type of boiler stove is most suitable

•  The correct size of your boiler stove – this should be calculated by an experienced engineer

•  The heat consumption and output of your stove

•  The size of your water tank

•  The level of hot water usage in your household

•  The number of radiators you have

•  Whether you have underfloor heating

Contact the experts at Charnwood for more advice on how to choose a suitable boiler stove.

How to get your boiler stove installed

A boiler stove must always be installed by a qualified heating engineer, with the skills, expertise and knowledge to ensure safe installation according to the recommended industry standard.

At Charnwood, our stoves are available exclusively throughout our network of selected stockists. We strongly recommend purchasing your boiler stove through an official Charnwood stockist, where you will receive the highest standards of installation and after-sales support. Click here to find out more.

Purchase your boiler stove today

If you are looking to purchase a boiler stove or are keen to find out more, contact Charnwood today. Our friendly, expert team are on hand and more than happy to answer any queries you may have.

charnwoodstoves

Serving Up Country Chic With a Twist

With more time being spent at home in 2020 due to the global pandemic, many of us have put our focus into rethinking our home design to create living spaces that are a pleasure to spend time in.
With this in mind, today we’re going to be shining the light on the living room, looking at ways you can conjure up the beauty of much-loved rustic interiors with a modern twist – ensuring your home is the perfect blend of classic and contemporary.

What is rustic interior design?

Rustic interior design can manifest itself in an array of different guises, from traditional country cottages and farmhouses to wooden ski lodges, French chateaus and Tuscan villas. However, at its core is the presence of raw, natural and organic materials and features that instantly conjure up that rural vibe. Put emphasis on these elements in your living room makeover and cleverly tie them in with modern features and you’ll have a new take on rustic interiors.

Lay the foundations with flooring

With any decor theme, your floors act as the foundation that sets the tone of the entire room, so getting this aspect pitch perfect is key to tying together classic and contemporary rustic style. Your first thought may well be hardwood floors that give your living room a homely and snug feel. However, in the name of modernity, this isn’t your only option. Instead, why not consider a more practical and durable material like wood-look luxury vinyl flooring?

Easy to clean, hardwearing and mimicking the look of wooden floorboards, you can have all the aesthetic appeal of wood with an innovative material that’s designed to last and requires minimal upkeep. You can even invest in underfloor heating mats that will bring your wood-look floors well and truly into the 21st century.

Add texture and layers to walls

The next step is to give your walls the attention they need to project that quintessentially country feel. For those with older properties that have original features, this is your time to let them take centre stage. From wooden beams and exposed stone to elegant open fireplaces, you can emphasise these traditional accents by giving them a more up-to-date look.

This could be painting wooden beams in white or a pale grey or applying a glossy lacquer to exposed stone and brick work. Similarly with original fireplaces, swerve quaint and kitsch Victorian tiles in favour of a more contemporary design for the surround and hearth that will give it a more edgy feel.

Of course, not all homes are blessed with period features. You can still get authentic-looking rustic decor in modern homes, however, using materials that portray the textures you get with the real deal.

This is where the modern concept of feature walls comes into play. Using rugged materials like split-face wall tiles or untreated wooden panels on one wall in your living room will instantly inject that essential texture and layering.

Finished with flourishes of classic and contemporary decorative accents like brass hooks, gold gilded ornaments and metal-framed mirrors, you’ll have an eclectic mix of old and new that contrast and complement each other in one fell swoop.

Create warmth with heating

 As a place to relax and unwind after a long day, your living room needs to be the epitome of comfort. Rustic-inspired decor is perfect for creating a homely, warm and lived in space. This is where choosing the right heating for your room can make a difference. Yes, you can make your rustic living room feel snug with just radiators, but there’s something special about a real fire that transports you from your average home to a rural farmhouse scene.

The addition of a traditional-style wood burning stove could be all you need to encapsulate that country aesthetic with the benefit of modern heat efficiency to keep you warm on those chilly nights. Take a look at log burners such as the Charnwood Bembridge (a collaborative stove created exclusively for the trail blazers of the modern rustic movement, Country Living)

Finished with a neat stack of wood or a wicker basket for kindling and some brass fire utensils, these stoves will effortlessly integrate into new and old homes, delivering a striking and practical feature for your rustic-style living room.

Embellish with finishing touches

When it comes to successfully combining country-style decor with contemporary design, the finishing touches you choose really count.

The key is to unify old and new furniture, soft furnishings and other decorative elements for a cohesive look that pays homage to both eras. An effective way to do this is to select a few genuine rustic pieces like a driftwood side table or a worn leather sofa and offset it with more modern materials like glass and metal. The smooth, shiny surfaces of newer materials will play well with the rough, lived in look of the older pieces to allow them to sit together harmoniously.

You can apply this contrasting principle to all your finishing touches, like setting a modern-style sofa with straight lines next to a hand-carved bookshelf or coffee table. Or adorn the room with funky light fixtures and raw wooden mirrors and picture frames. Take your time to experiment with different items and textures to get the combination just right and you’ll be left with a country chic living room that gives you all the charm of old with modern comforts.

Regardless of where you live, we hope you’ll find plenty of ideas on how to inject that countryside character into your living room, leaving you with a space that’s primed for relaxation every day of the week.

 

Author bio:

Alex Jones is a content creator for Trendy Floors, the home of discount flooring products with all the hallmarks of luxury – from affordable luxury vinyl tile to engineered parquet.

charnwoodstoves

If you are already the proud owner of a wood burner, or are considering making a purchase, you will not be disappointed. A wood burner is a superb addition to the home and an impressive focal point.

As winter approaches and the nights begin to draw in, what better way to spend chilly evenings than being nestled up next to your wood burning stove?

Before you fire up your wood burner and use it more regularly though, the Charnwood experts have compiled their tips on how to light a wood burner alongside other top tips, so you can get the absolute most out of your wood burner.

How to use a wood burner

If you are considering a wood burner purchase, it is crucial to ensure your desired stove is suitable for your home. We strongly recommend that a site survey is carried out by an experienced stove installer in the first instance before you make a purchase. Use our stove calculator to find out if your room is suitable.

How to make a fire in a wood burner

There are several stages to making a successful fire in a wood burner. If a fire is built and lit incorrectly, it can prevent the stove from getting hot. Follow these steps to make a successful wood burner fire:

Firstly you will need to ensure your wood is well seasoned and dry with a moisture content of less than 20% – if buying wood in smaller volumes look out for the Woodsure ‘Ready to Burn label’ which guarantees this.

When lighting your stove we recommend the top down method.

1) Leave some ash – the most efficient way to light a wood burning stove is to leave a little bit of ash from previous fires. However, you should still ensure the majority of the ash is cleaned out to avoid blocking air circulation.
2) Place 2-3 smaller logs on the stove bed
3) On top of this build a stack of 6-8 softwood kindling sticks
4) Then place a natural fire lighter inside
5) Fully open the air control as this will maximise the supply of oxygen in the wood burner needed to get the fire going.
6) Light the fire lighter and close the door but leave it slightly a jar
7) This helps to heat the chimney flue and burn hot and clean
8) Once the fire is burning well close the door and reduce the air intake
9) Re-fuel little and often
10) Every time a log is added open the air control again until the fire is burning well and then return the control to normal

By running your stove in this way you will achieve maximum efficiency with minimum emissions

How hot does a wood burner get?

Most wood burners range in temperature and can reach 190 – 343 degrees Celsius (375 – 650 degrees Fahrenheit). However, how hot a wood burner gets can depend on several factors including poor draft on the stove, air vents left closed or not open enough, incorrectly built/lit fire and use of wet wood.

How many logs do I need to put in a wood burner?

It is important not to overload your wood burner with logs, as this will mean the fire does not have enough oxygen to burn effectively. For a constant heat, have one or two logs in your wood burner at once.

How to get maximum heat from wood burner

There are several factors that could prevent your wood burner from achieving maximum heat, including:
The type of wood that is being burnt.
The moisture content of the wood.
How effectively the air supply to the fire is controlled.
How well the fire is maintained.

Achieve the maximum heat from your wood burner by:

Using softwoods to quickly get the fire started.
Using harder woods once the fire has started to produce more heat for longer periods.
Ensuring all wood burned is dry and doesn’t contain large amounts of moisture (as mentioned earlier we recommend a 20 per cent or lower moisture content threshold for firewood).
Periodically adding a few pieces of wood, rather than waiting for the flame to die down or adding large amounts of wood in one go.
Using air vents correctly to control airflow to the fire.
Having your flue cleaned and maintained regularly.
Cleaning and maintaining your wood burner stove regularly.
Ensuring your room has adequate ventilation to give the fire an oxygen supply.

How to keep a wood burner going

The below tips will help make a wood stove burn for longer:
Avoid using wet wood in your wood burning stove.
Reduce the air coming through the air vents to make the fire last longer.
A stove that contains cast iron elements are better for heat efficiency and will keep a fire going.
If you would like to find out more about wood burning stove cleaning tips and tricks in our blog, read: How to clean your wood burning stove.

What trees are the best to burn on a wood burner?

The best wood for burning on a wood burner are:
• Ash
• Oak
• Birch
• Beech
• Cherry
• Sycamore

How to put out a wood burner

Safely put out your wood burner by following these steps:
Starve the flames of oxygen by ensuring the stove door is completely closed.
Close all air vents and wait until the flames have died down to embers.
Wearing heat-resistant gloves, open the door and spread the remaining embers/pieces of wood using a fire poker.
Once the stove is cooled, sweep away any remaining ashes. An ash carrier can be a useful piece of equipment to assist in this.

Discover further cleaning and maintenance tips in our blog: How to clean wood burner glass.

Contact Charnwood today

To find out more about how to light your wood burner and keeping it well maintained, contact Charnwood today. Our friendly, expert team are on hand and more than happy to answer any queries you may have.

charnwoodstoves

Nothing quite compares to the roaring flames of a wood burner in the comfort of your own home.

A wood burner not only creates the perfect ambience on a cold winters day, but is also a superb focal point in the home.

However, before making this long-term investment and enjoying its many benefits, there are several factors to explore which will determine whether a wood burner is suitable for your home. From installation to size and fitting, we’ve compiled our top tips.

Can you install a wood burner if you have no chimney?

It is possible to have a wood burner installed in your home without a chimney. To achieve this, the wood burner must have a twin skin insulated flue system installed.

Before buying your wood burner, we would recommend a visit from an HETAS qualified heating engineer. They will visit your home and inspect the area where you would like your wood burner installed. They will offer expert advice on many elements, including building regulations, required flue systems and insulation.

Can I install a wood burner myself?

The installation of a wood burner is a highly specialised job and should be carried out by a trained professional. It is by no means a project to take on yourself, as if it is done incorrectly, it could be very dangerous.

If the stove and flue are not connected properly, or if the flue isn’t installed correctly, it can lead to harmful fumes entering the room, which can pose a significant safety risk to yourself and your family.

We recommend a visit from an HETAS qualified installer, who will be able to safely install your flue system. By using a registered installer, you have the confidence that you are receiving expert, trustworthy advice and your flue will be installed properly. A correctly installed wood burner will be safe, efficient and long-lasting.

Here at Charnwood, we work with a network of specialist installers, so you can be safe in the knowledge that your wood burner will not only be fitted correctly, but will be installed to last long-term.

How to line a chimney for a wood burner

A chimney liner is a stainless-steel tube that connects the top of the pipe that protrudes from a wood burner to the chimney pot. While there are several ways to line a chimney, fitting a chimney liner is the most common and cost-effective.

Lining a chimney for a wood burner is a two-person job, involving working at height and several steps:

Before fitting the liner, ensure you first sweep the chimney.

Remove the chimney pot.

Go to the roof and take a length of rope measuring five metres longer than your chimney height with a weight on the end and carefully drop this down your chimney.

A substantial amount of dust may fall down the chimney at this point, so ensure a dust mask, goggles and protective clothing are worn.

Once the rope is down the chimney, tie off the rope to prevent losing it down the chimney.

Bring the chimney liner to the roof and check the arrows to ensure it is the right way up.

Take care when holding the chimney liner and cover the ends of the liner with gaffer tape for added protection.

Attach the flex adapter, then fix three sets of wires to the liner adapter which enable you to attach the length of rope.

Put the closing plate over the top end of the liner and clamp the top fixing clamp.

Gently feed the liner into the chimney and straighten it to avoid any curls inside the flue.

Once the liner is in place, move the fixing clamp down the liner until it is resting on top of the chimney and supports the weight of the liner at the necessary height.

Cut any excess liner using a hacksaw so that around half the height of the chimney pot remains.

Make the area waterproof by making a mix of sand, cement and integral waterproofer.

Wet down the chimney, chimney pot, closing plate and end of the liner, before applying the cement mixture.

Wipe down and add a cowl to the chimney.

Connect the stove to the chimney liner adaptor with some rigid flue and allow 24 hours before lighting your stove.

Alternatively, a local registered installer will be able to fit the chimney liner for you. Contact us for further information.

How much should I pay for a wood burner to be fitted?

While each wood burner and its requirements are unique, you can expect to pay from £700 upwards for your wood burner to be fitted.

What size wood burner should I get?

It is essential that you measure the size of the room where you’d like your wood burner ahead of making a purchase. This will ensure that you buy the correct sized stove with the right amount of heat for the room where it will be installed.

If the wood burner gives off too much heat for the room, the space will become unpleasantly hot and the plaster around the stove may crack. Too low and you will not get the desired warmth needed within your chosen space.

As a rough guide, we recommend 1kW of heat output will heat 14 cubic metres.

How close can my TV be to my wood burner?

If you are considering placing your TV on the wall above your wood burner, we would strongly recommend contacting your TV manufacturer to determine how much heat your TV is able to withstand. You may also want to consult the operating manual for further information.

Contact Charnwood today

To find out more about your next wood burner and for advice around suitability for your home, contact Charnwood today. Our friendly, expert team are on hand and more than happy to answer any queries you may have.

charnwoodstoves

With the sudden drop in temperature and an autumn chill in the air, nothing beats a cosy evening nestled by your wood burning stove.

But as we head towards the winter months, your wood burner could need some TLC before its ready to be used more regularly.

To help keep your wood burner well maintained in readiness for those long winter nights, we’ve compiled our tips on how to clean wood burner glass alongside other upkeep advice.

How to keep wood burner glass clean

Your wood burner is not only a source of warmth, it is also a focal point within your home. Many modern generally feature clean-burn air wash which naturally keep the glass clean. However when used regularly, soot may build up on the glass door, which can drastically reduce the view of the fire. The most common cause of this is when wood with a moisture content higher than 20% is burnt or if a burning log is touching the glass.

Here are some do’s and don’ts on how to keep wood burner glass clean.

Do…

Use a damp crumpled paper towel or newspaper, dip it in fine wood ash and use this to rub the stove glass clean.

If there is substantial build up on the glass, burn a high temperature fire in the wood burning stove before you try to clean the glass. Ensure you have plenty of well-seasoned wood in your wood burner to create a fire of a high temperature.

Make sure you use a wood stove glass cleaner, or a ceramic stove top cleaner.

Ensure you wait until the wood burner glass is cool before you attempt to clean it.

Clean your wood burner glass on a regular basis to prevent a build-up of soot.

Don’t…

Never attempt to clean your wood burner glass when there is a fire burning inside the stove or the surface is hot.

Avoid spraying water on hot wood burner glass – this could cause the glass to crack or shatter.

Never use sharp objects or abrasive cleaners to clean your wood burner glass – these could damage and scratch the surface of the glass.

How to clean a wood burner

When it comes to cleaning your wood burner, there are many interior and exterior elements to consider.

Ensure exterior surfaces are cleaned with a soft brush, damp cloth or a vacuum cleaner. These will effectively remove any soot and dirt when the stove is cool.

Take the time to empty out the ash pan and firebox completely when your wood burner is not being used. Inspect the rope seals on the doors and flue, as it is not uncommon for these to become damaged through everyday wear and tear.

Find out more wood burning stove cleaning tips and tricks in our blog: How to clean your wood burning stove.

Why is my wood burner smoking?

If your wood burner is smoking, there could be several reasons, including:

A blocked chimney

The wrong fuel is being used

An issue with the air pressure in the room

A problem with the draw of your chimney

A cold weather snap

To stop your wood burner from smoking, you need to ensure you have the correct air pressure, no chimney blockages and are burning the correct fuel. If you have any further questions about your smoking wood burner, contact us today.

Why does my wood burner smell?

If your wood burner is emitting an unpleasant smell, it is unlikely that this is coming from the wood burner or stove itself. The smell is more likely being caused by other factors, including:

The stove is new and requires a ‘break in’ period

The fire is releasing too much smoke

Burning damp wood which contains too much moisture

Burning polluted wood

The fire isn’t hot enough

Blocked chimney or flue

Insufficient chimney size which cannot easily remove waste smoke and gases

Wet weather

If the weather is much lower than usual and smoke and gases cannot leave the home properly

Reduced airflow

 

Why is my wood burner not getting hot?

If your wood burner is not getting hot, this could be due to a variety of reasons:

• The draft on the stove is poor – draft on the stove is needed to suck air from the stove out of your home. If the waste gas is unable to escape, fresh air won’t be getting to the fire and this will prevent the stove from heating. Test the draft by lighting a piece of paper on one end and placing it under the flue outlet inside your stove. If the smoke disappears, the draft should work effectively when the fire starts.

• The air vents need opening – if the air vents aren’t open enough, it will prevent oxygen getting to the fire. Open up the air vents and create a larger supply of oxygen to enable to the fire to burn through the wood more quickly.

• The air vents are open too much – if the air vents are opened too much, the stove may not get hot. While the air vents should be opened fully when the fire is being lit to maximise oxygen levels, these can be gradually closed down as the fire gets hotter to ensure too much air isn’t getting to the fire.

• Lack of secondary combustion – this process involves maximising heat from burning wood by burning off waste gases from the fire. Secondary combustion will only occur when a higher temperature is reached.

• Fire incorrectly lit/built – if a fire is built and lit incorrectly, it will prevent the stove from getting hot. Lay crumpled pieces of paper on the bed of the stove to help encourage the fire to spread to the wood. Softwood kindling can then be placed on top of the newspaper, followed by smaller logs once the fire has caught.

• Wet wood – if your wood is too wet, the excess moisture will prevent your wood burner from getting hot. We recommend a 20 per cent or lower moisture content threshold for firewood. If your wood contains more moisture than this, it will need to be dried out for a further season before if can be used.

Find out more in our blog: How to use a wood burning stove.

How often should I sweep my wood burner chimney?

We recommend that wood burner chimneys are cleaned at least once a year. This should take place when the temperature drops in the cooler months before the wood burner is used more regularly.

Contact Charnwood today

To find out more about keeping your wood burner well maintained, contact Charnwood today. Our friendly, expert team are on hand and more than happy to answer any queries you may have.

charnwoodstoves

If you are already the proud owner of a wood burner, or are considering making a purchase, you will not be disappointed. A wood burner is a superb addition to the home and an impressive focal point.

As winter approaches and the nights begin to draw in, what better way to spend chilly evenings than being nestled up next to your wood burning stove?

Before you fire up your wood burner and use it more regularly though, the Charnwood experts have compiled their tips on how to light a wood burner alongside other top tips, so you can get the absolute most out of your wood burner.

How to use a wood burner

If you are considering a wood burner purchase, it is crucial to ensure your desired stove is suitable for your home. We strongly recommend that a site survey is carried out by an experienced stove installer in the first instance before you make a purchase. Use our stove calculator to find out if your room is suitable.

How to make a fire in a wood burner

There are several stages to making a successful fire in a wood burner. If a fire is built and lit incorrectly, it can prevent the stove from getting hot. Follow these steps to make a successful wood burner fire:

Firstly you will need to ensure your wood is well seasoned and dry with a moisture content of less than 20% – if buying wood in smaller volumes look out for the Woodsure ‘Ready to Burn label’ which guarantees this.

When lighting your stove we recommend the top down method.

1) Leave some ash – the most efficient way to light a wood burning stove is to leave a little bit of ash from previous fires. However, you should still ensure the majority of the ash is cleaned out to avoid blocking air circulation.
2) Place 2-3 smaller logs on the stove bed
3) On top of this build a stack of 6-8 softwood kindling sticks
4) Then place a natural fire lighter inside
5) Fully open the air control as this will maximise the supply of oxygen in the wood burner needed to get the fire going.
6) Light the fire lighter and close the door but leave it slightly a jar
7) This helps to heat the chimney flue and burn hot and clean
8) Once the fire is burning well close the door and reduce the air intake
9) Re-fuel little and often
10) Every time a log is added open the air control again until the fire is burning well and then return the control to normal

By running your stove in this way you will achieve maximum efficiency with minimum emissions

How hot does a wood burner get?

Most wood burners range in temperature and can reach 190 – 343 degrees Celsius (375 – 650 degrees Fahrenheit). However, how hot a wood burner gets can depend on several factors including poor draft on the stove, air vents left closed or not open enough, incorrectly built/lit fire and use of wet wood.

How many logs do I need to put in a wood burner?

It is important not to overload your wood burner with logs, as this will mean the fire does not have enough oxygen to burn effectively. For a constant heat, have one or two logs in your wood burner at once.

How to get maximum heat from wood burner

There are several factors that could prevent your wood burner from achieving maximum heat, including:
The type of wood that is being burnt.
The moisture content of the wood.
How effectively the air supply to the fire is controlled.
How well the fire is maintained.

Achieve the maximum heat from your wood burner by:

Using softwoods to quickly get the fire started.
Using harder woods once the fire has started to produce more heat for longer periods.
Ensuring all wood burned is dry and doesn’t contain large amounts of moisture (as mentioned earlier we recommend a 20 per cent or lower moisture content threshold for firewood).
Periodically adding a few pieces of wood, rather than waiting for the flame to die down or adding large amounts of wood in one go.
Using air vents correctly to control airflow to the fire.
Having your flue cleaned and maintained regularly.
Cleaning and maintaining your wood burner stove regularly.
Ensuring your room has adequate ventilation to give the fire an oxygen supply.

How to keep a wood burner going

The below tips will help make a wood stove burn for longer:
Avoid using wet wood in your wood burning stove.
Reduce the air coming through the air vents to make the fire last longer.
A stove that contains cast iron elements are better for heat efficiency and will keep a fire going.
If you would like to find out more about wood burning stove cleaning tips and tricks in our blog, read: How to clean your wood burning stove.

What trees are the best to burn on a wood burner?

The best wood for burning on a wood burner are:
• Ash
• Oak
• Birch
• Beech
• Cherry
• Sycamore

How to put out a wood burner

Safely put out your wood burner by following these steps:
Starve the flames of oxygen by ensuring the stove door is completely closed.
Close all air vents and wait until the flames have died down to embers.
Wearing heat-resistant gloves, open the door and spread the remaining embers/pieces of wood using a fire poker.
Once the stove is cooled, sweep away any remaining ashes. An ash carrier can be a useful piece of equipment to assist in this.

Discover further cleaning and maintenance tips in our blog: How to clean wood burner glass.

Contact Charnwood today

To find out more about how to light your wood burner and keeping it well maintained, contact Charnwood today. Our friendly, expert team are on hand and more than happy to answer any queries you may have.

charnwoodstoves

The importance of wall protection when installing a freestanding stove

As the cold season is fast approaching, many homeowners are rushing to prepare for the winter, and one effective way is to get your fireplace ready. As you will be aware, the fireplace serves to keep you and your family warm and comfortable during the winter months. Whether it’s a wood-burning or multi-fuel burner, it produces controlled heat that can warm your home’s space.

However, did you know that a vital part of the overall equation in your wood-burning stove is the heat shield? As the name suggests, it is typically installed behind a freestanding stove and it is designed to protect your wall from heat damage. However, while most wood stoves come with heat shields, some don’t have one.

In this article, we’ll specifically cover how to set clearances and install heat shields for wood stoves:

Have adequate clearances

When it comes to a wood stove, there are two key safety features you must keep in mind – sufficient clearance and wall material behind. A properly installed and maintained wood stove can ensure the safety of your appliance. Yet, inadequate clearances can be extremely dangerous for your home.

The Fire Protection Association recommends that the common radiant-type stove must be spaced out at least 900mm (36 inches) from a combustible wall although different wood burning stove manufacturers will offer their own tested safe distances. This is extremely important as your wood stove can get very hot when in operation. As a result, combustible materials too close to the stove can catch fire. By cheating on your wood stove’s clearances, you can potentially create a fire hazard.

Reduce wood stove clearances

On the other hand, know that you can reduce the clearance of your wood stove without compromising your home safety. Although you cannot completely eliminate the clearance, you can significantly reduce it. There’s only one solution to this, and that is to install a properly constructed heat shield.

For your reference, there are various types of heat shields you may want to consider for your wood stove. Be sure to follow the guidelines set forth by the HETAS for the heat shielding requirements, from the appliance selection down to its actual installation.

Vitreous Enamel heat shields

When it comes to wood stoves, installing a wall mounted heat shield is an excellent way to reduce clearance and promote home safety. A vitreous enamel heat shield is a great solution.

Vlaze Heat Shields are designed to protect and enhance the wall behind a wood burning stove creating a modern fireplace.

The vitreous enamel panel features a dual skin that provides thermal protection and an effective convection system that distributes heat back into the room. Using their rail mounted system the heat shield is quick and easy to install and is available in 3 sizes and over 30 luxurious glazed finishes. When installed on a wall the shield reduces the stoves distance to the face of the panel to 95mm and in the case of a Charnwood stove to just 75mm – a vast improvement on HETAS regulations.

Conclusion

At this point, you now know several valuable tips for your wood stove. As mentioned above, be sure to have adequate clearance or reduce wood stove clearances by installing heat shields. Furthermore, it’s best to deal with a reliable manufacturer when purchasing and installing a heat shield for your wood-burning stove. Doing so will help you make the most of your stove, protect your home, and keep you warm during the cold season!

 

 

charnwoodstoves

Home is where the hearth is: Tradition and forward-thinking technology are the fundamental tenets for this family-run Isle of Wight firm with more than half a century of history.

Back in 1972 when Charnwood Stoves founder Alfred Wells and two of his sons John and Alistair sat by an open fire in the village of Niton on the Isle of Wight, little did the trio know that their small engineering firm would become a 21st-century market leading company.

That night saw the three men come up with the notion to create a compact, efficient woodburning stove that was to become the cornerstone of the company. Fuelled by rapidly rising oil prices and the advent of Dutch Elm disease, meaning there was a plentiful supply of wood across the UK, their idea soon became a reality that today encompasses both traditional values and forward-thinking technology in the form of clean, green and efficient woodburning and multi-fuel stoves.

The privately owned family company employs around 140 people – ten of whom are family members – and continues to operate in the same location, to the same exacting standards set out by the three men some 50 years ago, with all stoves and accessories made on site with British parts. “Though we’re constantly innovating, our products are designed to last a lifetime,” says Ced Wells, grandson of Alfred and creative director of the company. “We still hold spare parts for our original stoves – we firmly believe that when you purchase a stove it is a long-term relationship.”

Tradition and prescient thinking are held in equal stead by the Wells family. Whilst the gentle crackle of burning logs and the soothing allure of flickering flames has long held a romantic appeal, as evidenced in Charnwood’s stylish designs spanning contemporary through to traditional, happily the reality of using wood as fuel equally sustains its draw. In order to best utilise the material’s properties as a renewable, sustainable and CO2-neutral fuel, technological solutions employed by the company include stoves with emissions so low that they are DEFRA-approved for burning wood in smoke-control areas, whilst the latest clean-burn technology in the Aire models amongst others ensures that the strict new Ecodesign regulation planned for 2022 is met as priority (the regulation being the stove industry’s response to the DEFRA Clean Air Strategy, which itself aims to improve air quality and reduce emissions and pollution).

Alongside its products, the relationships fostered by Charnwood are rooted in the family’s close-knit ethos and Christian beliefs, and extend into the community and beyond as a reflection of their deeply held values. “The concept of ‘relationship’ is probably the most important thing in our lives and business,” explains Ced. “We believe it’s important to take care of others, which in business terms manifests itself in supporting people – so our employees, our suppliers and our customers – and in connecting with the environment.”

In addition to using local suppliers and materials where possible, Charnwood’s commitment to the island pays homage to the intrinsic it plays in the company’s origin story. “The people that work for us have shaped what we have become,” says Ced. “They are our most valuable asset and are an extension of our family – many of them have been with us for more than 30 years.” As well as being well-connected to schools, colleges and businesses, the company offers apprenticeship schemes for young people in engineering, design and manufacture, “as job opportunities can be scarce on the island – and we very much want to see it thrive and grow as an economy.”

Plans for the future include a continued focus on uniting tradition with innovation: “We’re soon to be launching the world’s first intelligent woodburning stove that automatically burns your fuel to optimum efficiency,” outlines Ced. “The idea is that you load it, light it, close the door and then the stove does the rest” – a concept which doubtless is as faithful, loyal and consistently aligned with the core values of the company 50 years ago as it is today.

Words: Eve Middleton for The English Home November 2020

 

charnwoodstoves

Charnwood stoves specified for Danh Vo's Chicxulub show

We were recently asked to supply six Ecodesign Ready wood burning stoves for a show at The White Cube Gallery in Bermondsey, London. The work ‘Live Free or Die’ is part of artist Danh Vo’s exhibition, Chicxulub. Stacks of firewood are used to fuel six Charnwood Skye 7 stoves installed throughout the gallery, in return giving off heat and an atmospheric light which illuminates the space.

The stoves are placed on gloss black vitreous enamel Vlaze hearth plates

The show runs from 11 September – 2 November 2020 Click here for further details 

Stoves were installed by London stove specialists Stoake